Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Epilogue to Mary Duffy's Writing Guide: Writing Con Brio Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Epilogue to Mary Duffy's Writing Guide: Writing Con Brio

They have been at a great feast of languages and stol’n the scraps.
Love’s Labour’s Lost, Shakespeare

The longing not to die, the hunger for personal immortality, the effort by which we strive to persevere in our own being, this is the emotional basis for all knowledge and the intimate point of departure for all human philosophy.
The Tragic Sense of Life, Unamuno

You have now reached the end of this Book. After reading and studying the preceding chapters you should be able to write riveting prose.

When Nietzsche proclaimed, “Only as an aesthetic phenomenon is existence and the world forever justified,” he assigned representation —in particular language with all its tropes and components— the supreme value of being aesthetic.

When Polonius asked Hamlet, “What do you read, my Lord?” the prince answered: “Words—words.” But scrupulous writers must give more than just words for the public to read; they must arrange words in a manner that depict pathos, violence, and the rage and range of all human emotions.

Grammar, syntax, and rhetoric are but the tools of writing or the aesthetic phenomenon. “Language is the house of being,” Martin Heidegger proclaimed, and by that he meant that humans would never be homeless for they carry their homes within—which is their soul!

It is with words that we capture empirical reality. It is with words that we represent not only that empirical reality, but also that magical reality that is fiction. But none of this can be achieved if the writing lacks the variety, the rhythm, the suspense, and tension that the concepts we have studied provide.

How do you make a doughnut? You begin with a hole … likewise with writing.

There’s a certain emptiness, a void out there in the phenomenal world that only you —the writer who has felt that vacuum— can fill up, and do it with heart and mind.
What we ask is that the writer be daring, that the writer be different, or eccentric if you will.

By looking at reality with skepticism, new ideas will form, just as when Johannes Kepler discovered that planetary bodies moved in elliptical orbits as opposed to the conventional wisdom of circularity. That eccentricity paved the way for Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.

Writers must fill up the gaps and omissions—by means of their artistry—with effective, moving language. To do this writers should avoid the trap that normal speech sets: the pattern Subject-Verb-Complement, for an endless chain of this type of sentence is a recipe for disaster.

Roland Barthes in The Rustle of Language speaks of specialized realms: “on one side, Science, Reason, Fact; on the other, Art, Sensibility, Impression.” The truth is that humans own the sea of language into which the writer dives, floats, swims, or flounders, with both reason and art. With sweet voice and art the writer can create, inform, entertain, and enchant, just as Homer made the Sirens beguile Ulysses—and us.

And just as Calypso tempted Ulysses with knowledge, writers should also tempt readers not only with plain, ordinary knowledge—of the flora, fauna, and artifacts of this universe—but also with wisdom, with the unusual, with probing of the extraordinary.

Whether for good or evil, whether fact or fable, writers leave their wisdom in books and in the ultimate analysis, books are the repository of mankind’s knowledge.
It is my fervent desire that you, dear reader, study this humble guide and use some of the techniques. And that this should be done with care and love of language, with the same passion that Scott Fitzgerald, Harper Lee, Norman Mailer, John Updike, Scott Peck, Michiko Kakutani and other masters show in their craft, with God within (entheos)—with the ideals of beauty that Saint Thomas Aquinas and The Greeks favored, lest we say:

They have been at a great feast of languages and stol’n the scraps.

Every time I walk in front of Carnegie Hall, in my meanderings, I chuckle when I think of the answer a New Yorker gives to a tourister’s question,

“How do you get to Carnegie Hall?
“Practice, practice, practice.”

Novelist Mario Vargas Llosa in Letters to a Young Novelist writes:
… no one can teach anyone else to create; at most, we may be taught to read and write. The rest we must teach ourselves, stumbling, falling, and picking ourselves up over and over again.

We are all born with the power to see the world in full color and splendor. We don’t learn that; what we can learn is to stimulate this mysterious power and translate it into words—we can do it! It takes imitation and practice.

Imitate and practice the lessons of the great masters as we’ve highlighted in this book. With that experience behind you, the force of your own style will emerge.
Now it is up to you to satisfy the urge to write, to create, and so outdistance the ‘state of nature’ Hobbesian world—where no arts, letters, or science exist—I mention in the opening chapter. Writing requires that you read, writing requires that you think, but above all writing requires that you write.

“All men by nature desire to know,” thus Aristotle begins his Metaphysica. Your readers desire to know what you have to say. Write and fulfill their desire. You have a soul, a mind, and a heart full of ideas and feelings.

So write you must. To make a good omelet you need fresh ingredients, but more than anything else: you need to crack the eggs.
So, get cracking.

Mary Duffy's Writing Guide

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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