Sunday, July 28, 2013

The Narrator of Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway - Is He Gay or Bi?

In The Great Gatsby Scott Fitzgerald presents a study of wealth and ambition through the prism of pathetic characters for which one can find almost no socially redeeming values.

My ebook "Essays on the Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay? Is Daisy Buchanan Slow? is now available in amazon and Barnes and Noble:Is Nick Carraway Gay?

If you don't own a Kindle or Nook at present, you may download the ebook to your computer--for only $0.99


What the novel portrays is the sordid story of small band of feeble characters engaged in cheating, adultery, deception, and debauchery. The lavish parties --Jazz-age style-- that Jay Gatsby throws to recover Daisy Buchanan (his lost illusions and perfidious lover) are all but wild bacchanalians.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Essay 1 — Introduction to the Great Gatsby

Essay 2 — Nick Carraway, Narrator: Is He Gay? Or, Is he Bisexual?

Essay 3 — Daisy Buchanan: No Golden Girl but a Master of Echolalia and Deceit

Essay 4 — Purple Prose and Objective Correlatives in the Great Gatsby

Essay 5 — F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Style: Carpentry, Pulleys, and Scaffolding


Essay 1 — Introduction to the Great Gatsby


While volumes of criticism and book reviews have been written on The Great Gatsby, nowhere have I read any allusions to the fact that the all the main players in the story are morally degraded and of low intelligence—or to be charitable: mediocre.

In fact, it is possible that the heroine —Daisy Buchanan— may well be ‘slow,’ as shown by her own actions, assertions, and in dialogue. This may be construed as harsh criticism, but in my view it is justifiable criticism which is supported by the text.

This study contains two parts. First, we will argue that NYC did not corrupt the characters presented in the novel. Second, we’ll show the writing techniques that F. Scott Fitzgerald employed to depict his characters and their environment.

Contrary to what many might believe, New York City despite all its sins and flawed institutions doesn’t corrupt people, but the characters in the novel (Southerners and Midwesterners) reached the Big Apple as adults with their values already formed, stained, and doomed.

F. Scott Fitzgerald presents a study of ill-gained wealth and ambition through the prism of pathetic characters for which one cannot find any socially redeeming values. What The Great Gatsby portrays is the sordid story of small band of feeble characters engaged in cheating, adultery, deception, and debauchery. The lavish parties —Jazz-age style— that Jay Gatsby throws to recover his lost illusions and perfidious lover Daisy Buchanan, are all but wild bacchanalians.

When one thinks about of the rest of the nation, we can breathe a sigh of relief to see that the rest of Americans are engaged in productive enterprise, in rebuilding the nation after the waste of resources that was the First World War. The sordidness of the story applies, almost in its entirety, to that small band of marginal, misguided, and unsavory characters.

The Great Gatsby isn’t a book about the spiritual dismemberment of America (as many have interpreted the book to be) caused by the ‘roaring 20s’ and the Great Depression. No such dismemberment ever occurred; on the contrary, America went to become the leading industrial super power in the world.

The second part of the study unveils the writing techniques that Scott Fitzgerald employs to capture not only the spiritual nuances of his characters, but also the setting —Manhattan and Long Island— where the action transpires.

Yet, the Great Gatsby will endure simply because F. Scott Fitzgerald created a literary archetype: Jay Gatsby. While many great writers achieve temporary fame, only writers who invent archetypes will endure eternal fame, and in this respect Jay Gatsby will join the pantheon of heroes where we find: Heathcliff, Tarzan, Holly Golightly, Lolita, Mr. Darcy, Gregor Samsa, and Holden Caulfield—among others.

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My ebook "Essays on the Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay? Is Daisy Buchanan Slow? is now available in amazon and Barnes and Noble:Is Nick Carraway Gay?

If you don't own a Kindle or Nook at present, you can download this ebook to your computer: Only $0.99

 

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