Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Erasmus of Rotterdam on Clarity and Vagueness Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Saturday, January 30, 2010

Erasmus of Rotterdam on Clarity and Vagueness

Discussing the methods of sentence variation by using allegory and proverbs —which at times result in enigmas— in his book On Copia, Erasmus says: “For things should not be written in such a way that everyone understands everything, but so that they are forced to investigate things, and learn.” We often read that clarity, conciseness, terseness, should be what good writers strive for. Having seen these admonitions many times, Erasmus’ remark: “Things should not be written in such a way that everyone understands everything …” caught my eye. In fiction, some things are better handled if left unsaid—left open.

Henry James, novelist, master of nuance

For many years readers, scholars, and critics have been not only debating Henry James’ novelette The Turn of the Screw, but also interpreting it. Henry James, a master of nuance, has wrought a tale of terror that would have satisfied Erasmus because we are left “to investigate things, and learn.” In the tale only the young governess can see the ghosts, believing that the previous sinister governess and her lover are controlling the two orphaned children. It is a text that can be read and interpreted in many ways: as ghost story, a crime story, or a detective story. And in the end we are left with the enigma: is this woman mad?

Kafka, the absurd

Most of Kafka’s stories are open ended, resulting not only in enigmas, but also in insoluble paradoxes, problems of dehumanization, and other absurd human labyrinths. Is Gregor Samsa, a hero, an anti-hero, a pathetic character, or even a vermin? Who is to blame for his metamorphosis? And who kills him? Is it a sacrifice? “When Gregor Samsa woke up one morning from unsettling dreams, he found himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.” Isn’t possible to infer from the very beginning that the story is just a common nightmare? Likewise, in the Trial: “Someone must have been telling lies about Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning” Dragged through the corridors of the court and ‘the law,’ and on to his final night, Joseph K —and the readers— never learn what crime he committed.

Jorge Luis Borges, cerebral stories

In the work of Jorge Luis Borges we find stories that besides being cerebral are open to different interpretations. The short story “El Sur” is a hallucinating story in which the hero goes into his death with his eyes open and his boots on. Macho-like. Or did he? One of the possible interpretations is that he conjured all those images of gauchos that populate the South (of Argentina), at his deathbed in the hospital.

Ambrose Bierce, stories with a twist

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is a fantastic story with a stunning twist at the end. Like Jorge Luis Borges, the story in itself has a twist, but what makes it delightful is the language in which it is told. Deliberate. Spectacular. A mix of action and thought. Without wasting words, the author leads the reader through a dreamy path and on to a plausible and realistic conclusion. The Renaissance scholar Erasmus of Rotterdam may be correct: don’t make everything absolutely clear; your readers will respect you more if you leave something for them to ponder.



Senada Selmani, model

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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