Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Orwell's Rules for Writing Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Monday, April 12, 2010

Orwell's Rules for Writing

This picture appears in an old acreditation fo...Image via Wikipedia

In today's communication and information systems age, those who write standard English will claim their share of success. But how does one go about writing well? Throughout my professional career in business, George Orwell's rules for writing were my guiding light.

Because I fear that the sands of oblivion will inevitably bury this master of the English language, I want to show come courage and revive for the younger generations George Orwell's practical --if not indispensable-- rules for writing.

At one of the year-end parties I attended last year, I had an opportunity to meet two college young ladies (in their senior year) and chat with them for a while. Of course, the fact that both young ladies were majoring in English Literature raised my interest, for I was genuinely interested in learning what their generation was reading in college nowadays.

To begin with, in no time I realized (during our tete-a-tete) that I had to bridge the 'generation gap.' Imagine my surprise when I learned that neither one of the two young ladies had seen the movie "Rebel without a Cause," and neither one knew who even James Dean was. Well, no great deal here. While the movie plays on TV once in a while, there's really no reason why the younger generation should be interested in a 1955 movie. Since I was reading (at the time) Peter Ackroyd's rendition in prose of the Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, I asked their opinion about Chaucer.

"Not required reading," was their answer.

While many people build dams, bridges, pyramids, castles, cathedrals, and skyscrapers only few build languages. And two of the few that built the English language are Chaucer and Shakespeare. Geoffrey Chaucer lived in the 14th century and William Shakespeare in the 16th. What Homer and Hesiod are to Greek; what Cervantes is to Spanish, and what Dante is to Italian—so Chaucer and Shakespeare are to the English language. Next in importance comes the prolific writer George Orwell, whose self-appointed mission was to preserve, to maintain, and to watch over the beauty and practicality of English.

Given the above surprises with the mentioned college students, I would like to share the Orwell's rules of writing that have been my useful companions in my many years in business and academia:

1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print. 2. Never use a long word where a short one will do. 3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out. 4. Never use the passive where you can use the active. 5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. 6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

In addition, not only did Orwell write useful and practical essays on the proper use of the English language, but he also wrote great fiction. His novels Animal Farm and 1984 --satiric the former and prophetic the latter-- represent what we now refer to as the Orwellian nightmares. Though unintentionally written, many of his aphorisms are now part and parcel of the English language: "Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past (1984)."

To complete my respect for George Orwell, I will say that he was a man of conviction: served his country when called to serve, faithful to his politics, rebellious against authority, and a man of suffering and passion. These are his words:

"The Spanish war and other events in 1936-37 turned the scale and thereafter I knew where I stood. Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism, as I understand it."

It is through writing that he exorcised his demons; not by writing trivialities, but by writing on noble and serious topics; not as a polished stylist, or purist, but as a sober journalist; not as an academic, but as a practical man; not with vain dreams of glory, but with a humble, deep desire to serve his reading public.

Orwell's legacy is large, but at the end of the day, his rules for writing well, that touches me the most.

To further honor George Orwell, let me go back to my third paragraph and expunge tete-a-tete, which is in violation of rule 5. And from the last paragraph let me remove "at the end of the day," an expression often heard and seen in print.
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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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