Saturday, May 22, 2010

Book Reviews and Criticism: East of Tiffany's

Review: Jacquie Adorno,June 29, 2010: East of Tiffany's by Mary Duffy and Marciano Guerrero is a collection of short stories that will move you, make you cry, capture your heart and remind you of divine intervention. The writing styles of the authors is incredible, every page captures your imagination, tugs at your heart and reminds you that human beings are exceptional even when they are at their lowest point.

The stories in this book not only reflect the daily beliefs and struggles that tear at people every day, but they also educate you and make you think about "what would I do, if that were me?"

When I started reading this book I was in awe. The immense love and respect the authors have for each other, and their writing is something very rare. There are a number of "favorite" stories in this book, but three tugged at my heart. In "Mary Patricia and I become lifetime sojourners," Marciano Guerrero writes about the love of his life, "When I'm awake I think of you, when I sleep I dream of you, and in my dreams you are my hypnosis, my delirium, and my peace" (Pg 3). This quote made me cry, we all dream about this type of love; Marciano and Mary were blessed with it.

In Dog Heaven, we are reminded of the love pet owners have for their pets and how we think of them as one of our children, part of our family. Reading this story brought back tears and beautiful memories of my own "pepino" and it reminded me of the emptiness we feel when our pets go to heaven.

Devine intervention is a belief that I was raised with. In Watching over blue babies, Marciano Guerrero demonstrates that there is no higher power than faith and prayer. When he drops to his knees and says "I have tested your patience dear lord, punish me, but let this child live" (pg 40). We are reminded that in difficult times when we are at our lowest, we all turn to a higher being.

The Duffy - Guerrero partnership is a great success!!!

I recommend this book to anyone who wants to read and experience the human touch!

I Also Recommend her other book: Toolbox for Writers.

Review by Ramira Duarte: The book "East of Tiffany" has been more than a guide throughout my life than just reading a novel or a normal book. When I first started reading this book, my first impression was the amazing words Marciano Guerrero used to describe the love he has for his wife in this reading, the sincere words that each are describing the enormous importance Mary Patricia has been to his life since he met her. My favorite story is "Mary Patricia and I become lifetime sojourners," which is the first story of the book. In this story I personally admire the love these two characters have for each other, and all that they have been through, but holding on to each other no matter what. "When I'm awake I think of you, when I sleep I dream of you, and in my dreams you are my hypnosis, my delirium, and my peace" (Pg 3). This is one of my favorites quotes in this story. By now I have read the whole story, because once you have started reading this book, you don't want to stop till your totally done with it. I really recommend reading this book, because it gives multiple advice for us college students about persisting on our dreams and goals.

Review by Zimantha Brissett: This book makes for such a pleasant read. East of Tiffany's is a captivating glimpse into the lives of New Yorkers. You may not get where its going at first but slowly with each short story it begins to lay itself out in front of you like a new and interesting road. This book is filled with tales of love, understanding and decision. A must read.

Kristine Cuenco Posted June 7, 2010, 7:34 PM EST: I found this book useful and comprehensive because of it's vivid details in each short story. It captures the essence of the inhabitants of New York City's East Side. It is definitely a great read when you are sitting down at Central Park's Great Lawn on a sunny day. I recommend this book to people who are a fan of short stories.

Juan Diaz Posted June 5, 2010, 6:45 AM EST: What makes this book so great is the capability of leaving you a life-lesson upon every single story. I did feel touched more that once while reading. So, I want to quote two lines that have been captive in my mind since. "Because Mary Patricia likes to eat fruit every day, I made it a point to always bring home an apple, bananas, grapes, or cantaloupes . . . My gesture, though, was more spiritual than nutritional -never come home empty handed". Adding "Early in our marriage I learned that Mary Patricia wished to be consulted in all my decisions, no matter how petty or insignificant. So, I made the promise to myself that not only would I consult with her, but over consult". This represents for me a really wise and lovely thought that I personally would like to use as a guideline when living with my beloved. A successful relationship is not only based on receiving but giving what you believe is important for your partner, altogether with the willingness of constantly learning from it.

Rizwan: Posted June 8, 2010, 4:10 PM EST: Having read the book "East of Tiffany's" stories several times, I highly recommend the book: they are fast-paced and entertaining. The stories were very engaging and touching and the descriptions were so lively that at point I felt like everything is happening in front of me, so truly written from heart and the writer meant every words of it. I would definitely recommend this book to any readers outside and inside New York City and in fact anyone in this world who enjoys reading books. The book is about different kinds of people who live in lovely East Side of Manhattan and the stories are from the author real life experience. It is filled with a lot of interesting stories from real life of real poeple. It is definitely an "A" grade book and I m sure new readers will enjoy it much as I did.

Review by: Kristen Kay. Reading these short stories put me right in the midst of the East Side of Manhattan. Not only are the stories charming and realistic, but also moral. One learns there's a lot of good in this world. Any writer of any level (aspiring, budding, or advanced) can learn how to write stories by following this book. To be specific, I love the story "Luke," the last one of the collection. By getting inside Luke's mind and nervous system (feeling with him), I enjoyed tremendously the man's pain and joy, his highs and lows, his moments of exultation and depression. Such a pity that we don't get to see more of Luke. I wish he'd reappear in the future. I can't wait for the next book by these authors. Meanwhile I will re-read some of the stories. Just as Tiffany's (the store) is for gifts, this year I will give copies of this book to my friends for their birthdays and at Christmas time. The book is really a jewel and it should be sold inside Tiffany's!

Review by: Syed sajjad. East of tiffany's is one of the best book that I have ever read. It's so interesting that I finished it in one day. I felt connected from the beginning till the end. This Book has some amazing short stories that will entertain as if you are watching a movie. I definitely recommend this book to everyone. Thanks. Order from Amazon.com.

Review by Vidya T. Satrohan. East of Tiffany's is an excellent book; it will make you laugh while teaching you simple lessons about life.

Review by: Christopher Kelly. East of Tiffany's definitely exceeded my expectations. The stories were very engaging and touching, to say the least, and I found myself simultaneously wanting to hear more about each character while having a sense of closure at the end of each short story. That in itself is a very difficult task which both authors masterfully achieved with what seems to be effortless writing. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone from New York City because it will answer the timeless question, "Why is that guy lifting his leg to a tree while his dog is just staring at him...is the dog walking the guy?" I would also recommend this book to anyone outside of New York City because it's a rare glimpse into a world where you never know where one interaction with a person, or pet will get you.

Review by Mary Ellen Tompkins. East of Tiffany's is a well written and fun book. The stories are heartwarming and show the more human and compassionate side of life in New York City. Order from Amazon.com

Review by Brahim Aguezoum. This book introduces me about the life in east Manhattan through many characters, and how friendly the New Yorkers are.

Review by Ananthapol Sangkhanit. East of Tiffany's is one of the best books I have read. The book is about different kinds of people who live in lovely East Side of Manhattan and the stories are from the author real life experience. It is filled with a lot of interesting stories from cover to cover. There is on such a place like East Side of Manhattan. Where else can you find a bartender who does not drink? I have to give the author the thumbs up. He has such a good sense of humor that makes the stories flow smoothly and enjoyable. You will never get bored. I strongly recommend East of Tiffany's to everybody. You will find out every second that you spend on this book is a special moment.

Review by Shabbir Dalal. It is one of the best books that I have read. You can read this book on the subways, buses and whenever you have time. A refreshing look into different aspects of life. The words carry magic of emotions as if you are part of the happenings. Emotions gush out and you feel fresh and relived as it touches and shed light to many shadowed areas of our life. I felt very touched by the story of the sweet dog Pepino; though animal he was in control of the author till the last minute and even commands emotion of its readers. The different phase of life and rich variety of experiences are woven together with distinct demarcation of short stories. All in all a very good book to read! The author touches the subject matter of faith, loyalty, bonding, budding, romance, elegance, isolation, struggles, conflicts and resolve. A very interesting book for everyone to read!

Review by J. Anderson: The stories are like having a conversation and a glass of wine with an old friend, pleasant, comfortable, and for people who don't live in New York, a view of life that shows there is a sweetness here that most don't expect.

Review by Pablo Maldonado. This book is great, very easily to read and the stories are very inspired; bringing us the perspectives of various lives. The stories are not boring at all (unlike many others) and since there are brief and independent you don't have to wait up to the end of the book to get the main point the author projects. You won't stop once you start. I really like the "blue babies" story. It's a story almost impossible to believe but since I got the privilege of being knowing the author I believe it. This particular story is invaluable for me and has left its mark in my life. I definitely recommend this book, a book out of ordinary.

Review by Michael Galante Jr. This book has very much to offer. It's filled with stories that pertain to reality in which many can relate to or that many can look up too. It's filled with moving and inspirational choices and stories in life. It's filled with love, "real love" and it touches the heart on every level. It is also emotional and sad but through all the hard times life brings, it shows the ability to stay strong and move forward without grief taking over. This book filled with many inspirational stories has definitely shined a light on my life as a struggling person to keep strong and move forward. In addition, this book is well written and well put together. I definitely recommend this book to all readers. Order from Amazon.com

Review by Johan Arenas. I found this book to be great, I hadn't read a book beginning to end in about six years, but yesterday when I sat down to read this book; I had the mindset that I would read the first ten pages and then I would sit down and watch some TV, but the book started to grow on me. I finished the book this afternoon and must admit that thanks to this book an interest to read has came over me. The book was easy to read yet challenging, it was entertaining yet so real, I was able to get to know so many people in the book, so many stories yet all coming together to the same place. This book is great for anyone who lives in a city as big as New York, and yet feels so empty, because it shows the humanity that even though at times it seems that we lack we all are the same kind-- humankind. And last but not least this book can be a great inspirational tool for all war veterans coming from war as myself, who feel that we are alone, this book shows that we are not, and that there are other veterans in the past who have gone through the same things and made it. Thanks to Mary Duffy and Marciano Guerrero for putting this together, it has been a great inspiration for me. I hope to read more books in the future by you.

Review by Georgia K. The principles that I have learned in the first few chapters are amazing. The first chapter, I have to say was my favorite. One thing I will always carry with me is "when you go to a woman think that you are touching the petal of a rose never hurt her or yell at her - or the bloom will fade," another one is "A man is only half- man if he provides half for his family and half for himself." What makes this book a very good book is the fact that life, love, business and school are put together in a series of short stories in a marvelous way.

Book review by Kim: Do pick up this book. The stories are like little ice cream bon bons. Short and sweet and satisfying. And of course--at the end you'll find yourself wanting more.

Kim WildeKim Wilde
Book review by Amaya88, May 22, 2010:
I have finished reading the book East Of Tiffany's and it was incredible. I must say my feelings were deeply touched and affected by each short story I have read. My mind had a thirst for each experience written. It was very beneficial to have learned and envisioned how life is in the east side of Manhattan including the morals of these unforgettable people. I really look forward to read future stories by Mary Duffy and Marciano Guerrero and will continue to work hard and use these memories mentioned to assure to myself that if you work hard and put a strong effort in life then one day you can be gifted with happiness and joy like these characters were in this magnificent novel.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Pythagoras, Samuel Johnson, and Reviewing the Past Day

{{it|Busto di Pitagora. Copia romana di origin...Image via Wikipedia

In front of the Delphic Oracle-temple is written: Know Thyself. Now, being fond of Samuel Johnson's Essays, which I often read and re-read, one fine day I read some practical remarks that complemented the Delphic maxim.

Johnson, a most versatile Augustan writer, besides writing the first English dictionary was a superb essayist. His prose is impeccable, witty, and profound. But what I most admire in his essays are the manner in which he opens his sentences. Years go by, and I always pay attention to his sentence openers. From him, I think, I first became aware that the secret of writing agile prose is by commanding fresh and exciting sentence beginnings.

But I digress. Though I had my own method of going over the events of the day --my accomplishments as well as my failures of the day-- I found that Johnson's article had some golden nuggets of wisdom.

"All action has its origin in the mind," he says casually; yet many of us think that we are doers rather than thinkers, when in reality the opposite is true.

And he goes on:
"The recollection of the past is only useful by way of provision for the future."
Ah! Another nugget! Of what practical value is it to retrace and rehash our past activities if they are not to be put to good use in the future? Enthralled rather than just impressed by the man's folksy wisdom of re-stating the obvious, I appropriated his maxims. So at night, as I retire to peaceful slumber I pass in review the significant acts of my day.

In as much as I can recollect I begin with the first act, and proceed: "What is that I did first thing in the morning?" I ask myself. "Oh, yes. I canceled that credit card that had charged me such an exorbitant fee for missing the payment for one day." Of course, I ignore the trivial acts such as going to the cleaners, the pharmacy, or for a croissant across the street; lest the act assumes significance. For example, one day, in response to my ritual, "How are you?" the young attendant from Ecuador proceeds to tell me about her baby being ill and in danger of losing his hearing due to a tumor. Having enough cash leftover from my allowance I gave the woman a $20 bill—"Take a cab when you go home," I said. "I know you'd want to get home quicker."

Where have I turned aside from rectitude? - Searching my memory I catalog moments of behavior that may have been improper or even offending. Was I curt with the officer at the bank? It is possible. Every time I go to the bank I am accosted by employees who are instructed by their superiors to sequester customers and give them a pitch about opening more accounts, or moving money to their investment funds, and so forth. "You guys are overdoing this!" I exploded.

What have I been doing? - This is my favorite pointed question, for I want to make sure that I haven't squandered the day, that I've been productive and totally engaged. I dislike wasting time. Have I accomplished all my allotted tasks for the day? If yes, I enjoy the moment of happiness; if not I sulk and propose to even the score the next day.

What have I left undone, which I ought to have done? - In a normal day everyone, I am sure, has some tasks that are repetitive, routine, tedious, and often unpleasant. So, I go over what I left undone. "Oh, yes -- I have to mark those 40 exams!" I admit. "But let me divide the task. I'll grade 20 in the morning and the other 20 in the afternoon."

Because the brief method works for me, let me share it, just as Samuel Johnson did. So here is the full quotation:
"Let not sleep, says Pythagoras, fall upon thy eyes till thou has thrice reviewed the transaction of the past day. Where have I turned aside from rectitude? What have I been doing? What have I left undone, which I ought to have done? Begin thus from the first act, and proceed, and in conclusion at the ill which thou has done be troubled, and rejoice for the good."

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Friedman: social responsibility of business is...Image by ocean.flynn via Flickr

After a long (40 years), productive, and successful career in business, I now teach college. The articles that follow are all written from personal experience.



If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.
Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

Senada Selmani, model

To write great blogs, e-mails, term papers, essays, or fiction - Get Mary Duffy's

Sentence Openers




Itching to Become a Writer?


Visit Mary Duffy's Storefront

What is an Evergreen Resume?

View of the inside of the Elmer Holmes Bobst L...Image via Wikipedia

Your ticket to the good life begins with a sheet of paper. Indeed, but that sheet of paper can become the magic tool that will help you reach your goals. I know a Harvard graduate who owns a 14-page resume, but --irony or ironies!-- he has been unemployed for 6 years. A one-sheet resume often is better than a 14-page one.

To land a job we need a resume; no one can argue about this fact. But to land a good job, you need a good resume; to land a fantastic job, you need well crafted resume.
As a result many applicants spend a great deal of time and money crafting and then massaging that resume until it can no longer be improved upon. In the end, the time, the effort, and the money spent really pays off, since we all eventually manage to get a job (except the Harvard grad with the 14-page resume).

But is the whole object of a resume to simply find a job?

Unfortunately, for 99 percent of workers it is. Once employed, we get into a ghastly routine: collect a paycheck every week or every 2 weeks, put food on the table, pay the rent, pay all the other bills, maybe save a little for a laptop, a short trip to Cancun, etc.

While Jacob (Genesis) saw --in a magnificent dream-- a ladder that reached up to heaven, the earthy go-getter and self-starter worker should see the initial resume as the bottom step of the ladder with which to climb upward to better things--financial heaven! Jacob's ladder is another name for "getting up there!"

If you take a workshop, a seminar, an online or classroom-attendance course, update your resume. Do not wait! Did you get married or divorced? Update your resume! Did you have a child? Spruce up your resume. Did you travel overseas? Have you written a book or article? Are you volunteering for something? Did you run a marathon? Then list the event. Often what on the surface may seem an insignificant event, in the end it can be the attention grabber that can bring that awaited promotion.

Here's an anecdote from my personal experience: once I updated my resume by adding a remark: "Earned 3 credits at NYU: Proust and Memory Enhancement." When a new boss came into the department, she interviewed me for an opening as district manager that she had just created. She simply said to me, "I love Proust; my minor was French Literature."

Here's an experience from literature: one of my favorite novels is Stendhal's The Red and the Black. The hero, Julien Sorel, uses a ladder not only to ford rivers and to negotiate thick gardens and terraces, but also to climb up and into Mme. De Renal's boudoir. The point is that like Julien one must constantly carry the image of the ladder of success on our shoulders.

On another occasion, when my second child was born, I updated my resume. And almost as an afterthought, as if in a whim, I included my wife and children's names and dates of birth--all in one line. Again, this proved to be fruitful during a promotion interview. My boss said, "My daughter's name is Kay also--same age as your daughter. Maybe they should get together."

Just as a fine gardener keeps his grounds green, all ambitious workers should keep their resumes evergreen. Every time you update your resume send a copy to the Human Resources, and your boss. This little maneuver will get you ahead of peers and competitors.

At the feared annual evaluation, bring up an updated resume. Use it to highlight what you have been doing to enhance your skills and how they will help you to be a better producer; perhaps even become a stellar performer.

Conclusion

Convert the traditional resume into an evergreen resume. The updates are the steps with which you are building the ladder of success.

In war, the Biblical Maccabees, constructed huge ladders to climb walls and conquer their enemies. Plato (Socrates) saw a ladder as the means to reach the immutable realm of ideas (universals); in business, you must trust the ladder that you yourself have built.

Wittgenstein --discussing language and meaning--said,
"he must so to speak throw away the ladder, after he has climbed up on it."

My recommendation is keep the ladder handy, for there's always higher heights to reach in the financial heavens.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]


Friedman: social responsibility of business is...Image by ocean.flynn via Flickr

After a long (40 years), productive, and successful career in business, I now teach college. The articles that follow are all written from personal experience.



If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.
Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

Senada Selmani, model

To write great blogs, e-mails, term papers, essays, or fiction - Get Mary Duffy's

Sentence Openers




Itching to Become a Writer?


Visit Mary Duffy's Storefront

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Making Money on the Downside: BP

BP plcImage via Wikipedia

On April 20, 2010, as soon as the news of the oil spill broke, I felt there was an opportunity. Yes, indeed! BP was the owner of the disaster. So I shorted BP at $57 and on May 7th, I covered. Made 17% return on my money--not too shabby.

Selling short is an investment technique in which you bet on the losing horse. Well, I felt that BP was the losing horse. One thing, though, you must not be too greedy. While many would expect a 17% on a short too puny a return--I'm satisfied.

I invested $100,000 and made $17,000. I wanted to sell only $10,000, but the opportunity was there, so why not go for it? Now, the same results can be obtained by investing only $10,000 but buying call options. But this is a technique that requires more sophistication and experience.

Keep abreast of the news. Cynical as it may sound, what is a disaster for some, could be an advantage for others.

Alesya Nazarova modeling a dress by Bebe - Pho...Image via Wikipedia

How to Diversify


Debt Financing


Credit Scores


P/E Ratio, Crystal Ball


Fixed Index Annuities

Making Money on the Downside:BP

If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.

Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

Current Liabilities


Adam Smith and Wealth


Personal Budgeting


Investing in Stocks


Professor Guerrero Laws for Wealth


Economic Terms for the Impatient: What is ...?


Social Security Maximization


Senada Selmani, model

To write great blogs, e-mails, term papers, essays, or fiction - Get Mary Duffy's

Sentence Openers




Itching to Become a Writer?


Visit Mary Duffy's Storefront





Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Friday, May 14, 2010

The Tragic Sense of Life - Book Review of Unamuno's Philosophical Classic


"Was man made for science, or was science made for man?" To Unamuno science was secondary to man's destiny, which is to live well.

Whenever life fills me with doubt, I turn to The Tragic Sense of Life and my faith is quickly restored. Faith and reason. The man of flesh and bone. Immortality. These are the themes Unamuno discusses with the ardent --fanatical I'd say--hunger for God.

Heavy thinkers such as Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Spinoza, and Descartes, Unamuno dismisses with stern righteousness. Little value does he place in knowledge--gnosis, rationality--attacking Descartes' arrogance as well as Spinoza's atheism. Wither knowledge? he asks: "The end of man is to create science, to catalogue the Universe, so that it may be handed back to God in order...." he answers himself by quoting a thought from one of his novels. Yet, no praise is too lavish for passion and suffering--emblems of existentialism.

Dostoesvsky's irrational, irreverent, disdainful Underground Man says, "After all suffering is the sole cause of consciousness." Unamuno, like Dostoesvky and other Christian existentialists see the transitoriness of this real world--exalting passion and suffering over reason, truth, and beauty--as prelude to the ideal world of eternity where one returns to God.

Lesser thinkers such as Lucretius, John Stuart Mill, Freud, Marx, Sartre, and other atheists never felt the meaning of the word 'suffering.' Freud came close to understanding it when he said that religion comes about because of the human desire to escape death (The Future of an Illusion). That is partially correct. The ultimate truth is that men are the only beings that go through life knowing that death is a certainty--hence the lifetime uffering.

Those who are wise accept that certainty and find consolation in death as a return to God. Those who are knowledgeable seek more knowledge instead of acceptance and live to die alone; and what can be sadder than the utter desolation of a godless man?

Among the men of flesh and bone--the suffering ones--there have been typical examples of those who possess this tragic sense of life. I recall now Marcus Aurelius, St. Augustine, Pascal, Rousseau . . . Kierkegaard─men burdened with wisdom rather than with knowledge.

There are some fine translations of this book, but I prefer J. E. Crawford Flitch’s who has taken the trouble to add his own Endnotes. Believers as well as unbelievers could well profit from Unamuno’s book.

After such shoddy fiction as the DaVinci Code, and fake TV Documentaries (The Tomb of Jesus), I find solace, wisdom, respect for God, and much joy as I read pages upon pages of this beloved book--The Tragic Sense of Life. Read it and enjoy it.

Opening prologue of The Wife of Bath's Tale fr...Image via Wikipedia



Augustine, City of God
Austen J, Pride and Prejudice
Austen J, "Marriage Proposals and Me"
Austen J, Emma
Borges, The Aleph
C. Bronte, Jane Eyre
Burroughs E,Tarzan
Cervantes, Don Quijote
Chaucer, Wife of Bath
Coelho P,The Alchemist
Coyle H, They Are Soldiers
Dante, New Life
Dickens C, David Copperfield
Dostoevsky, Crime&Punishment
ConanDoyle,Hound of Baskervilles
Dubner S, Superfreakonomics

DuMaurier D, Rebecca
Ellis B. E. American Psycho
Fitzgerald S, Great Gatsby
Flaubert G, Madame Bovary
Fleming I,Doctor No
Freud S, Leonardo Da Vinci
Friedan B, Feminine Mystique
GarciaMarquez, Of Love & OtherDemons
GarciaMarquez,OneHundredYrs
Guerrero M,ThePoison Pill
If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.

Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

More Book Reviews...!



Grass G, The Tin Drum
Harris T, Hannibal Rising
Heidegger M,House of Being
Ishiguro K, Remains of The Day
Johnson S,Rasselas
Kafka,Metamorphosis
Kosinski J, The Painted Bird
Lee H,To Kill a Mockingbird
McBain Ed,Gutter and Grave
Murakami H,Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Nabokov V, Lolita
Meyer, S, Twilight
Ortega,Dehumanization of Art
Poe E A, Gordon Pym
Prose F, Reading Like a Writer
Rushdie S,Midnight Children
Sabatini R, Scaramouche
Spark M, Prime of Miss Brodie

Stendhal, Red and Black
Sterne L,Tristram Shandy
Stevenson R, Dr.Jekyll & Mr.Hyde
Stoker B, Dracula
Thackeray W,History of Pendennis
Tolstoy L, Anna Karenina
Trollope A, Autobiography
Unamuno M, Tragic Sense of Life
Voltaire, Candide
Webb J, Fields of Fire
Wharton E, The House of Mirth
Woolf V, To The Lighhouse


The secrets of 'no-doze' prose:
Mary Duffy's Sentence Openers



Lindsey Vonn after winning the Downhill World ...
Image via Wikipedia

Lindsey Vonn





The writing techniques I employ in this article are all explained in Mary Duffy's writing manual:

www.writerivetingprose.com




Back to main page

Book Reviews and Criticism

Opening prologue of The Wife of Bath's Tale fr...Image via Wikipedia



Augustine, City of God
Austen J, Pride and Prejudice
Austen J, "Marriage Proposals and Me"
Austen J, Emma
Borges, The Aleph
C. Bronte, Jane Eyre
Burroughs E,Tarzan
Cervantes, Don Quijote
Chaucer, Wife of Bath
Coelho P,The Alchemist
Coyle H, They Are Soldiers
Dante, New Life
Dickens C, David Copperfield
Dostoevsky, Crime&Punishment
ConanDoyle,Hound of Baskervilles
Dubner S, Superfreakonomics

DuMaurier D, Rebecca
Ellis B. E. American Psycho
Fitzgerald S, Great Gatsby
Flaubert G, Madame Bovary
Fleming I,Doctor No
Freud S, Leonardo Da Vinci
Friedan B, Feminine Mystique
GarciaMarquez, Of Love & OtherDemons
GarciaMarquez,OneHundredYrs
Guerrero M,ThePoison Pill
If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.

Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

More Book Reviews...!



Grass G, The Tin Drum
Harris T, Hannibal Rising
Heidegger M,House of Being
Ishiguro K, Remains of The Day
Johnson S,Rasselas
Kafka,Metamorphosis
Kosinski J, The Painted Bird
Lee H,To Kill a Mockingbird
McBain Ed,Gutter and Grave
Murakami H,Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Nabokov V, Lolita
Meyer, S, Twilight
Ortega,Dehumanization of Art
Poe E A, Gordon Pym
Prose F, Reading Like a Writer
Rushdie S,Midnight Children
Sabatini R, Scaramouche
Spark M, Prime of Miss Brodie

Stendhal, Red and Black
Sterne L,Tristram Shandy
Stevenson R, Dr.Jekyll & Mr.Hyde
Stoker B, Dracula
Thackeray W,History of Pendennis
Tolstoy L, Anna Karenina
Trollope A, Autobiography
Unamuno M, Tragic Sense of Life
Voltaire, Candide
Webb J, Fields of Fire
Wharton E, The House of Mirth
Woolf V, To The Lighhouse


The secrets of 'no-doze' prose:
Mary Duffy's Sentence Openers



Lindsey Vonn after winning the Downhill World ...
Image via Wikipedia

Lindsey Vonn



Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Life-Time Opportunities in Accounting

The Seal of the United States Federal Bureau o...Image via Wikipedia


Accountants find employment in private companies, government agencies, and as private practitioners preparing income tax returns, as well as financial advisors.
A bachelor’s degree in accounting or in a related field (economics, finance, or management) opens the door to entry-level jobs in accounting, allowing beginning accountants (with an average annual salary of $48,993) to gain experience.

Major Fields for Accountants:

Public accounting. For this field, accounting majors are required to fulfill course requirements as listed by the State. Most 4-year colleges will fulfill those requirements as part of their major. To become a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) requires passing four separate exams and auditing experience of 2 years. Accountants wishing the CPA certification will find entry-level jobs in large auditing firms, where the hiring salary range is $50-70K.

Government accounting. All levels of government (townships, counties, cities, state, and the Federal government) hire accountants. The FBI, the SEC, and the IRS are sure employers of accountants, where many make life-time careers.

Forensic Accounting
This is a highly specialized field of accounting. After gaining experience in general accounting, some professionals take courses in forensic accounting (John Jay College or ITT) and establish a practice in accounting and criminal justice. Given the number of frauds uncovered during bad times, forensic accountant are in great demand. Once established the practice can become quite lucrative.

But those who beyond a bachelors degree and earn master’s degree in accounting or a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) reach to top level executive positions as corporate controllers, or treasurers. Annual salaries range from $100K to $200K, not counting stock option, bonuses, and other perks.
Ch1 Accounting in Action

Ch2 Recording Process

Ch3 Adjusting the Accounts

Ch4 Completing the Accounting Cycle

Ch5 Merchandising Operations

Ch6 Inventories

Ch7 Accounting Information Systems

Ch8 Internal Control and Cash

Ch9 Accounting for Receivables

Ch10 PP&E, Natural Resources, and Intangible Assets

Ch11 Current Liabilities and Payroll


Ch12 Partnerships

Ch13 Corporations

Ch14 Corporations:Dividends, RE

Ch15 Long Term Liabilities

Ch16 Investment

Accounting Opportunities


If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.
Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

Ch17 Statement of Cash Flows

Ch18 Financial Statement Analysis

Plato and Accounting

Price/Earnings Ratio

Plant Assets

Luca Pacioli and DaVinci


The secrets of 'no-doze' prose:
Mary Duffy's Sentence Openers









Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Maximize Your Social Security Benefits

Scanned image of author's US Social Security card.Image via Wikipedia

Brief History of Social Security
The Social Security Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt on August 14, 1935. In addition to several provisions for general welfare, the new Act created a social insurance program designed to pay retired workers age 65 or older a continuing income after retirement.
"We can never insure one hundred percent of the population against one hundred percent of the hazards and vicissitudes of life, but we have tried to frame a law which will give some measure of protection to the average citizen and to his family against the loss of a job and against poverty-ridden old age."--
President Roosevelt upon signing Social Security Act

Double Your Social Security Benefits
By now what was an innocuous expression: “social insecurity,” has become a serious concern for many people approaching retirement age. “Will Social Security be there for me?” is the fearful question; especially for those who never could build a 401K or IRAs.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects Social Security will reach a $10 billion deficit this year and bleed another $9 billion in 2011. But, will the politicians the let program go bankrupt? Hardly! You can bet your bottom dollar that the program will be patched up and continue for a long time to come.
The soon-to-retire waves of Baby Boomers account for the largest voting bloc, and they will insure that their benefits aren’t taken away. Knowing this, wouldn’t you like to double the size of your Social Security checks?

By delaying the start of your benefits from age 62 to 70 you can maximize your benefits. If it is impossible for you to wait till you are 70, at least try to avoid taking Social Security until age 66. This little maneuver will increase the size of your checks by one third. Now is the time to start reading up, getting involved, getting immersed in the details. Most retirees don’t have the luxury of financial advisors—they must figure things out by themselves.

A Few Facts to get started:
About 75% of seniors apply for their pension between age 62 and 65 and 67. The earliest age at which one can sign up for the program is 62.

Married couples can employ advantageous strategies to collect social Security early and still maximize their checks how.

Why we should wait
For example: Joe Senior born on January 2, 1948, who earns $80,200, would receive $2,157 a month from Social Security at his normal full retirement age of 66. But if he retires this year (at 62), he'll receive only $1,458 a month--about a third less. Using Social Security's projections, if he waits until 70, his checks will start at $3,303 — more than double what he'd get at 62.
In six years the money forfeited from age 66 to 70 ($150,000), Joe Senior recoups the $150,000 by receiving the bigger checks. From 77 on he’ll be enjoying his wise decision. Through age 85, he'll have collected $786,450, or $219,462 more than if he had started benefits at 62.

Working after retirement
Under Social Security rules, in 2010, if you receive Social Security checks before the full retirement age (65), you must forfeit $1 of your benefits for each $2 you earn over $14,160 (you can't collect any benefits if you earn more than $42,960). If you reach your full retirement age in 2010, Social Security holds back one dollar for every $3 earned over $37,680. After you've reached full retirement age the earnings penalty stops.

Evaluating the Numbers
According to the agency's web site if you start at age 62, you'll get 25 percent to 30 percent less than at your full retirement age. To get good idea what your actual benefits will be based on what you've earned (your checks are based on the average of your 35 highest-paying years), use Social Security's retirement estimator calculator.

Before you start your Social Security consider:
Your health: For those with a serious illness or family history of short life expectancies, taking benefits right away makes sense. But for most people, delaying benefits until their normal retirement age or later is best because, on average, Americans in their 50s and 60s will live until their mid-80s.

Two websites provide calculators to estimate life expectancy (factoring in family history and lifestyle): livingto100.com and bluezones.com.

Marital status: For married couples, delaying your checks will not only improve your benefit, it will mean a larger survivor benefit for your spouse — larger benefits that will last for the rest of his or her life. Statistics show that there's an 81% chance that one or both members of a 65-year-old couple will live to 85, a 58% chance that one or both will make it to ninety.

Personal plans: Of course advice here can't take into account your very personal goals: You may want to put off taking Social Security late because you love to work and wish to keep on working into your late 60s and don't need the government checks. Or, you may want to receive the money early so you can move to Guatemala, or Greece—where the cost of living is much cheaper.

Marriage has its benefits
1. You can claim a Social Security benefit based on your own work record or your spouse's work record. The maximum spousal benefit is 50% of what your husband or wife will receive.
2. A widow or widower who starts collecting survivor benefits at the normal retirement age or older generally earns 100 percent of the deceased spouse's benefit. But the amount shrinks to 71 to 99% if you start getting survivor benefits between 60 and your normal retirement age.
3. You can forget about collecting your benefit and your spousal (or survivor's) benefit at the same time. You can only receive the larger of the two.
4. You must wait to apply for a spousal benefit until your husband or wife has filed for Social Security.

Couples May Collect Early Under the “62/70 Strategy”
Married couples who can't afford postponing Social Security altogether can use a technique known as the "62/70 Strategy" to maximize benefits over the long term. With this system, the lower-earning spouse files for Social Security at age 62 and the higher earner delays until age 70. No matter which spouse dies first, the smaller benefit will die off too.

Example: Assume Tom's full benefit will be $2,157 a month. His wife Tina's full retirement benefit will be $1,081 a month; at 62, she'd receive $721 a month. Tina applies for her $721 benefit at 62, and Tom delays claiming his checks until 70, when he'll collect $3,303. If Tom dies at 82, his monthly benefit will have grown to $4,601 because he had waited until 70 to start collecting. That $4,601 then becomes Tina's survivor benefit, and it will be 88% more than Jane would have received if Tom had begun collecting at age 62.

Although Tom is waiting until 70 to start receiving his benefits, at 66 he can apply for a spousal benefit based on Tina's work record while his own benefit keeps growing. (If he was younger than 66, he couldn't do that). Because he has reached his full retirement age, Tom qualifies for the maximum spousal benefit: $541 a month, or 50 percent of Tina's $1,081 benefit. When John hits 70, he'll drop the spousal benefit and start collecting his own larger benefit.

Disclaimer
This article doesn’t claim perfection or even accuracy. Some of the figures are estimates and should not be relied in their entirety; they are simply used to illustrate major points. Visit the Social Security Administration website and get to know it, get acquainted with it and you’ll be pleasantly surprised about the wealth of information. If you can, work with a retirement specialist, a financial advisor, tax preparer, or an accountant.
Debt Financing


Credit Scores


P/E Ratio, Crystal Ball


Fixed Index Annuities

If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.

Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

Current Liabilities


Adam Smith and Wealth


Personal Budgeting


Investing in Stocks


Professor Guerrero Laws for Wealth


Economic Terms for the Impatient: What is ...?


Social Security Maximization


Senada Selmani, model

To write great blogs, e-mails, term papers, essays, or fiction - Get Mary Duffy's

Sentence Openers




Itching to Become a Writer?


Visit Mary Duffy's Storefront




Reblog this post [with Zemanta]