Friday, July 30, 2010

Review of East of Tiffany's by Carolina L. Gomez

July 29, 2010: This book has 13 wonderful short stories that relate to the experiences that most humans encounter in their lifetime. From being an adolescent to being an elder, one or more of these stories will capture your heart. Each story has its original tone and main idea with one connection: All the main characters, at one point or another, lived in East of Tiffany's. From love stories to war stories, this book shines a light on most of the important lessons in life.

The story that I related to the most to my personal life was "Marriage Vows and Genesis". This is a story all married women would love for her husband to read and simulate. This short story holds the key to a happy marriage. Take into consideration that the authors have been together for more than half a century. You can't possibly get better insight anywhere else!

Being a mother and a believer in the power of prayer, I can say that the story that I enjoyed the most is "Watching Over Blue Babies." In this story the author is exclaiming how proud he is of his daughter when he suddenly has a flashback to the day his daughter was born. After a few complications and much prayer, the worried father gives a sigh of relief when his daughter survives. After the flashback, the writer makes a jaw dropping, celestial connection from the day his daughter was born to the present. This story impressed me so much that it left me wanting more.

Opening prologue of The Wife of Bath's Tale fr...Image via Wikipedia



Augustine, City of God
Austen J, Pride and Prejudice
Austen J, "Marriage Proposals and Me"
Austen J, Emma
Borges, The Aleph
C. Bronte, Jane Eyre
Burroughs E,Tarzan
Cervantes, Don Quijote
Chaucer, Wife of Bath
Coelho P,The Alchemist
Coyle H, They Are Soldiers
Dante, New Life
Dickens C, David Copperfield
Dostoevsky, Crime&Punishment
ConanDoyle,Hound of Baskervilles
Dubner S, Superfreakonomics

DuMaurier D, Rebecca
Ellis B. E. American Psycho
Fitzgerald S, Great Gatsby
Flaubert G, Madame Bovary
Fleming I,Doctor No
Freud S, Leonardo Da Vinci
Friedan B, Feminine Mystique
GarciaMarquez, Of Love & OtherDemons
GarciaMarquez,OneHundredYrs
Guerrero M,ThePoison Pill
Guerrero, M,East of Tiffany's
If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.

Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

More Book Reviews...!



Grass G, The Tin Drum
Harris T, Hannibal Rising
Heidegger M,House of Being
Ishiguro K, Remains of The Day
Johnson S,Rasselas
Kafka,Metamorphosis
Kosinski J, The Painted Bird
Lee H,To Kill a Mockingbird
McBain Ed,Gutter and Grave
Murakami H,Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Nabokov V, Lolita
Meyer, S, Twilight
Ortega,Dehumanization of Art
Poe E A, Gordon Pym
Prose F, Reading Like a Writer
Rushdie S,Midnight Children
Sabatini R, Scaramouche
Spark M, Prime of Miss Brodie

Stendhal, Red and Black
Sterne L,Tristram Shandy
Stevenson R, Dr.Jekyll & Mr.Hyde
Stoker B, Dracula
Thackeray W,History of Pendennis
Tolstoy L, Anna Karenina
Trollope A, Autobiography
Unamuno M, Tragic Sense of Life
Voltaire, Candide
Webb J, Fields of Fire
Wharton E, The House of Mirth
Woolf V, To The Lighhouse


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Lindsey Vonn after winning the Downhill World ...
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Lindsey Vonn



Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The Pathetic Fallacy in Fiction

Cover of serial, "Pickwick Club" by ...Image via Wikipedia

Writers have the tendency to spice up their text by attributing human feelings to nature and also to human-created objects.

Creative writers impute and endow feelings, emotions, impulses, intuitions, and other traits that humans possess, to forests, rivers, lakes, oceans, animals, the wind, rain, storms, etc.

Here’s an example from Charles Dickens’ The Pickwick Papers:
The evening grew more dull every moment, and a melancholy wind sounded through the deserted fields, like a distant giant whistling for his house-dog. The sadness of the scene imparted a somber tinge to the feelings of Mr. Winkle. He started as they passed the angle of the trench—it looked like a colossal grave.
People grow dull or sharp, not evenings. What Dickens is doing is setting up a scene with which he intends to startle his readers, to put them in a state of suspense and terror. And if Dickens doesn’t fully intends to terrorize his readers at least he would have achieved a good scare—or at worst, get their attention.

Likewise, people grow melancholy and not the wind.

If you read closely you’ll see the elements (imagery) that Dickens uses to achieve that primeval fear we all carry within: dogs howling, whistling as we pass a cemetery and its graves. And by using the word ‘giant’ he magnifies, elongates, and distorts the nature and the objects to animate them and cause strangeness.

Related to the pathetic fallacy are the techniques of ‘animation’ and ‘objective correlatives.’

Originally posted in Writersrepublic.com

  • Oxymoron in Action

  • IanFleming's Intransitive Verbs

  • Orwell's Rules for Writing

  • How to Use Similes

  • What is an Allegory?

  • StephenKing vs StephenieMeyer

  • The Pathetic Fallacy

  • If you are interested in seeing how I achieved personal success in the United States, you may find my book of short stories East of Tiffany's interesting. Some of the stories are based on my life as an executive, investment banker, and financial adviser to wealthy investors in the East Side of Manhattan.
    Close to half-million people have read East of Tiffany's so far. Order your copy from either Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.
    Since English is my second language, Mary Duffy --a master of the English language-- aided me not only with the editing, but she also contributed her own stories. I love her writing in "When You Wish Upon a Star." This is a story based on a personal friend's life.

    Senada Selmani, model

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