Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood: Dante Gabriel Rossetti Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood: Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Proserpine (Oil on canvas, 1874) - Tate Britai...Image via WikipediaIn the 19th-century —around 1848— a group of English writers and painters gathered around Dante Gabriel Rossetti, who was then a most influential painter and poet. Members of the group were William Rossetti and the painters Holman Hunt, Edward Millais, Burne-Jones, Christina Rossetti, William Morris, and Swinburne.
Gabriel Charles Dante Rossetti, who later changed the order of his names to stress his kinship with the great Italian poet Dante, was born in London May 12, 1828, to his Italian immigrant parents.
In the late '60s Rossetti began to suffer from headaches and weakened eyesight, and began to take chloral mixed with whiskey to cure insomnia; such mixture made worse his depression and paranoia. Critic Robert Buchanan attacked Rossetti and Swinburne, calling his school "The Fleshly School of Poetry" (1871). Such attack —there are plenty of reviews of books of Buchanan in the Web— changed him completely. In the summer of 1872 he suffered a mental breakdown, complete with hallucinations and accusing voices. He was taken to Scotland, where he attempted suicide, but gradually recovered, and within a few months was able to paint again. He died of kidney failure on April 9, 1882.
The group members (or the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, as they called themselves) insisted that painters should paint whatever they see, and not follow the formal rules of painting. Nature was to be painted just as it was filtered by the painter’s experience, and in no way altered just because of the methods of previous painters.
In becoming a writer, or a painter, or an artist in general, creative people must often break away from the strait-jackets imposed by tradition. A similar attitude we find in novelist Janes Asten (austen persuasion), who rebelled against the Gothic patterns of her predecessors.
To highlight their new direction in painting, they called the group Pre-Raphaelite, not because they wanted to honor early Italian painting but because they wanted to break away from the rules and strictures laid down by Ra­phael for painting ideal figures.
Not only did their work showed respect for nature, but also profound personal experiences. They achieved sharply realized details. They took not the least account of the poverty or the vitality of contemporary England and its social and economic problems, turning instead to a heroic and embellished world of the Middle Ages, and also to a poetry which by symbolism, imagery, and music created a pictorial impression or a vague mood from which all ideas some­times disappeared.
For the sensual elements ("fleshly mysticism") of such poems as Rossetti's The Blessed Damozel they were condemned with the pejorative sobriquet: the "fleshly school."
Art was then enriched by the Pre-Raphaelites, by disengaging art from the mundane and vulgar events that happened in the world. In that, they held that it is not the business of the artist to instruct or to solve social problems; they believe in ‘art for art’s sake.’ And by skirting the contemporary life ugly issues, they were able to focus in the sensuous and decorative beauty—they achieved the new direction they so much desired.
The group was influential in subsequent artists, such as the symbolists.
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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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