Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: The Best-Selling Novels That Made You Snore Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Friday, October 29, 2010

The Best-Selling Novels That Made You Snore

Audrey NiffeneggerImage via Wikipedia I remember starting a thread on a forum once, in which I asked other readers if they disliked a particular best-selling novel as much as I did—A Reliable Wife, by Robert Goolrick.
It turned out not many had read it, but someone else started another thread about how much she disliked The Time Traveler’s Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger. Many jumped into the conversation, claiming they also didn’t care for the book.
The reason I bring this up is because I happen to have picked up “The Time Traveler’s Wife” from the library this week, and I’m about a third of the way through it. So far, so good—although I don’t think it’s one I’ll be praising from the rooftops or anything.
A novel can’t be all things to all people. Here are some of the best-selling books I just didn’t get:
A Reliable Wife, by Robert Goolrick. The story didn’t have me convinced, and I found the writing extremely repetitive.
Twilight, by Stephenie Meyer. I read it this past summer and found it…well… poorly written and kind of boring.
Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen. This is one I thought I’d love, but for some reason I just couldn’t get into it. Maybe I just wasn’t that interested in the subject matter.
The Angel’s Game, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. When I picked it up, I didn’t realize this book was a sequel. Perhaps I would’ve liked it more if I’d read the first book, The Shadow of the Wind. It wasn’t horrible, but I found it extremely long and a bit corny.
One reader’s trash is another reader’s treasure. No two people will enjoy all the same books, and even like-minded individuals will differ in their opinions of certain stories.
However, we as writers should be able to look at a novel and recognize what factors led to its popularity, whether we enjoy reading it ourselves, or not.
Take “Twilight,” for example. I didn’t like it, but that doesn’t mean I don’t understand why it became a best-seller. Let’s face it: teenagers love vampires and romance. Put them together, and the rest is history.
Nathan Bransford says:
…the one question that aspiring writers should never ask themselves when reading a book is, “Do I like this?”
Whether we like a book or not is irrelevant.
Instead, Bransford advises that we consider whether the book meets the goals set out by its author.
It’s easy to look at a best-seller and say we don’t care for it, but it’s difficult to realize that no matter what we write, or how well we write, someone will think the same about our work.
And that’s okay. You can’t please everyone.
If you check out the Amazon.com reader reviews of the best-sellers I didn’t like, you’ll see that all of them do have a high number of four and five star reviews. That means somebody enjoyed them—in fact, the majority of readers did.
Which best-selling novels did you dislike, and why? If you need inspiration, check out:
Also, on a more positive note, which best-sellers did you love?
Some of my picks are Life of Pi, by Yann Martel; A Series of Unfortunate Events, by Lemony Snicket; The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, by Mark Haddon; The Prince of Tides, by Pat Conroy; and The Help by Kathryn Stockett.
Please share and promote this article if you enjoyed reading it! Get new articles for free. Type your best email below and click Send to my Inbox.
Or, if you like catching up via a feed reader, please subscribe using RSS.
View the original article here

Labels: , ,


Comments on "The Best-Selling Novels That Made You Snore"

 

post a comment


Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

BROWSE: MORE THAN 560 ARTICLES

Book Reviews   Accounting 1   How to Become a Writer   Personal Finance   Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Accounting2 Solutions   Greeks Romans Trojans   Feminism   Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

Back to Top

Free Counter
Free Counter