Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Example of Essay: Sophocles' Antigone Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Friday, October 8, 2010

Example of Essay: Sophocles' Antigone

Antigone And The Body Of Polynices - Project G...Image via Wikipedia

Sophocles (c. 441 B.C.). The story of Antigone is part of the Oedipus legend. For aspiring writers, this play offers great challenges on how to write an essay, or even a narrower assignment: how to write a college essay.

The curse on the house of Labdacus not only brought about the double fratricide of Eteocles and Polynices but also involved their two sisters Ismene and Antigone. Both sons plotted to rule Thebes by turn, but when Eteocles refused to give up power to Polynices, they fought against each other-both died in battle.

Anti­gone, the heroic daughter of King Oedipus, insisted upon giving her brother Polynices (who had been named a traitor to the city of Thebes) the last human right, the rite of burial. Despite the fact that Antigone knew she was violating the ancient custom of deny­ing burial to enemies and traitors, as well as the decree of Creon, her uncle, who had just succeeded to the throne, she went against tradition.
Sophocles en­dowed his heroine, Antigone, with the highest moral qualities, setting her up as an ideal heroine for all mankind to admire. Filled with an unmatched sense of duty based on close family ties, Antigone is unyielding. Her sister Ismene, in contrast, represents the law-abiding citizens' point of view, the view of the multitudes who dare not challenge deeply ingrained customs, traditions, and the law of the land.

But the climax of the tragedy is the encounter between Creon, the tyrant, and Antigone the martyr: physical power against spiritual strength. Representing the loyal people of Thebes is the chorus, as it ex­presses the logic of the plebeian everyday world; just like Ismene, they both submit to civil law.
The denouement of the tragedy comes when Nemesis -a goddess- takes sides as well as Creon's family as punishment for his stubbornness, causing the great ruler to end up as a weakling ordinary man. Yet, Antigone must also lose her life.

Sophocles' attitude shows in the tragedy: the gods cannot allow the violation of the integrity and human dignity of man; transgression must not go unpunished. Rulers must not abuse his subjects with impunity, for it is a hundred times better to die as Antigone than to go on suffering an unjust human law. And though Creon finally sees Antigone's point of view, it is really too late, and the loss of life ensues right on stage: in the end Haemon (Antigone's beloved), his mother, and Antigone herself, they all commit suicide.

In the midst of much suffering and loss of life, Creon, the tyrant, remains standing and alive.

But Antigone is not to be understood as a perfect character. Her tragic flaw lies in her insolence toward civil authority. Yet her determination and the sheer spectacle of a young woman sacrificing love and live for an ideal will forever gain the sympathy of readers and audiences alike.

Writing conclusions are always difficult. In my view, the reader must be left with something to ponder. So, as an example of essay, with which to wrap up a conclusion, use a question:
The question remains, was Antigone a martyr saint, or simply a social activist?

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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