Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Writers: How Do You Cope with Give Up Moments? Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Monday, October 25, 2010

Writers: How Do You Cope with Give Up Moments?

A smiling baby lying in a soft cot (furniture).Image via Wikipedia I’m feeling a little stressed these days.
Last night, and every night for more than ten months, I’ve had very little sleep. My baby likes to wake up every two hours, and get up for the day at four in the morning. I get up with him, which means by dinner I’m ready for bed.
Today, my older son happened to be sick, too. Now that my throat is sore, I’m suspecting he’s been kind enough to pass along his cold.
Still, it isn’t really the extreme lack of sleep or feeling under the weather that’s stressing me out. The sleep issue is ongoing, but I’ve sort of adjusted. The illness will be short-lived, so I can handle that.
No, the biggest reason I’m feeling stressed is because I’m finding it increasingly difficult to find time to write.
Though it sounds pretty insignificant, one issue affecting the amount of time I spend writing is the fact that my almost-ten-month-old son has recently become mobile. He’s crawling everywhere, pulling up on everything, and ready to go, go, go, all day long. Our house is pretty cramped, so danger lurks around every corner.
Now, instead of having a snuggle on the couch with baby and my laptop, and pounding out several hundred words, I’m jumping up every 30 seconds to redirect him to a safer crawling route.
Don’t get me wrong–I’m very grateful my son is healthy, happy, and full of energy. It’s just that I can’t possibly write more than one sentence at a time while he’s awake.
(Did I mention he doesn’t nap, either??)
The other day I was trying to work on a freelance piece in the midst of my baby’s exploration, and I started to realize there was just no point in continuing. It was physically impossible to do anything but follow him around everywhere he went.
I asked myself why I was even bothering with that article. In fact, for a while I figured I should give up not only the piece I was working on, but everything to do with writing.
Wouldn’t life be so much easier if I didn’t care anymore? I could go back to watching television at night. I’d have more time to clean the house during the day. My mind wouldn’t be a constant deluge of nagging ideas.
Yes, it was perfect. So I said, I give up.
I did give up writing, you know—for about 12 hours. That was all it took for me to realize I just needed a break. I also realized that if I wasn’t in this for the long haul, I would have given up ages ago.
After some time to relax and rethink things, I came up with a great idea—an idea that would help me write and concentrate a little more, while ensuring baby had room to explore in safety.
I repositioned my older son’s bed to section off half of his bedroom, and moved all of his stuff to the opposite side of the room. When I need some time to write, baby and I go in there with some toys,  and shut the door. I sit on the bed with my laptop, and baby plays in the carpeted area in front of the bed. Voila! No need to redirect him—he’s safe, and he can even pull up on the side of the bed (as opposed to the t.v. stand or the bookshelf), or look at himself in the full-length mirror bolted to the wall.
It may not be an ideal situation, and my writing sessions are much shorter than they used to be, but the point is that rather than give up on writing, I found a solution to my problem. I also remind myself that this issue is temporary. Babies grow, they change, and one day I’ll have a lot more time for writing.
What things make you want to give up writing for good? How do you deal with them?
Please take a moment to share any strategies or tips you have for coping with give up moments.
Please share and promote this article if you enjoyed reading it! Get new articles for free. Type your best email below and click Send to my Inbox.
Or, if you like catching up via a feed reader, please subscribe using RSS.
View the original article here

Labels: ,


Comments on "Writers: How Do You Cope with Give Up Moments?"

 

post a comment


Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

BROWSE: MORE THAN 560 ARTICLES

Book Reviews   Accounting 1   How to Become a Writer   Personal Finance   Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Accounting2 Solutions   Greeks Romans Trojans   Feminism   Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

Back to Top

Free Counter
Free Counter