Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Literary Tree-Spotting Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Monday, November 8, 2010

Literary Tree-Spotting

Cover of "The French Lieutenant's Woman"Cover of The French Lieutenant's WomanThis has been a good few weeks for trees, and not just the ones that have finally burst into full flaming color here in New York.
The fall season has seen the release of some notable new books with an arboreal bent, including Patrick Dougherty’s “Stickwork” (a chronicle of his amazing twig constructions), Leanne Shapton’s gorgeous “Native Trees of Canada” (featured last Sunday on the back page of the Book Review) and Allen J. Coombes’s magnificent “Book of Leaves: A Leaf-by-Leaf Guide to Six Hundred of the World’s Great Trees.”
Coombes’s five-pound compendium — insert your dead-tree joke here — gets my vote for the book I’d be most likely to take on a hike in the woods, provided I had a pack animal. But for a casual walk in the forest, or an overnight bivouac in the depths of a favorite armchair, I’d recommend John Fowles’s beautiful essay “The Tree.”
Just released in a 30th-anniversary edition, “The Tree” is a hard-to-summarize meditation on art, nature, individualism and mortality — sort of a cross between Thoreau’s “Walden” and John Berger’s “Ways of Seeing,” with a dash of “The Gift,” Lewis Hyde’s cult-classic manifesto on creativity, thrown in for good measure.

Fowles, best known for the novels “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” and “The Magus,” begins with his difficult relationship with his father (a vigorous pruner of fruit trees), moves on through ancient myths of the “green man” and a paean to the philosophy-tinged science of the 18th century, and somehow ends up at a comparison between the art of rambling and the art of novel-writing. I would give a more thorough summary, if I hadn’t just read Fowles’s swipes at professional literary critics, whose pseudo-objective approach to art is likened to an effort to “defoliate the wicked green man, hunt him out of his trees.”
So much so-called nature writing seems designed to prompt hushed piety — and instead ends up putting the reader, or at least this one, to sleep. But “The Tree” seems just as likely to start loud and interesting arguments.
I found myself wondering what E.O. Wilson, the great naturalist and epic poet of the ant, would make of Fowles’s contention that modern science has killed the mystery of nature, or that technological evolution has reduced man to a “thinking termite.” (You got a problem with termites?) And what would Edward Abbey, the cranky poet laureate of the American desert, growl in response to Fowles’s tree-centric notion of wilderness, or the claim that dense forests are the landscape that lead us most directly to our deepest selves?
But it’s hard to argue with the eerie beauty of Fowles’s final pages, where he hikes into Wistman’s Wood, a remnant of primeval oak forest dating from the Ice Age, tucked into a crack in the treeless wastes of Dartmoor, in southern England.
Fowles’s descriptions of this fairy-landscape are lush unto ravishing (and larded, I must say, with more than a trace of scientific understanding of the place). But as much as Fowles is inspired by Wistman’s Wood, he is also defeated and silenced by it. As he puts it,
It is the silence, the waitingness of the place, that is so haunting; a quality all woods will have on occasion, but which is overwhelming here — a drama, but of a time span humanity cannot conceive. A pastness, a presentness, a skill with tenses the writer in me knows he will never know; partly out of his own inadequacies, partly because there are tenses human language has yet to invent.
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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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