Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: The Lazarillo of Tormes (New Translation from the Spanish by Marciano Guerrero) Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The Lazarillo of Tormes (New Translation from the Spanish by Marciano Guerrero)

Yayo el idolo picaresco de la argentina.Image via Wikipedia


 The Lazarillo of Tormes
Translated from the Spanish by




Marciano Guerrero
7/16/2011





  
 TABLE OF CONTENTS


Translator’s Introduction

Prologue

Chapter 1 - Lazaro Tells about His Parents

Chapter 2 - How Lazaro Finds a New Master: a Priest

Chapter 3 - How Lazaro Found his Third Master: a Squire 

Chapter 4 - How Lazaro Found his Fourth Master: a Friar of the Order of Mercy

Chapter 5 - How Lazaro Found his Fifth Master: a Pardoner

Chapter 6 - How Lazaro Went to Work for a Chaplain

Chapter 7 - How Lazaro Went to Work for a Constable


TRANSLATOR’S INTRODUCTION

 One year in the middle of the sixteenth century a brief book —totally unlike the boring pastoral novels and even the adventurous novels of chivalry— appeared like a new morning star. It was The Lazarillo of Tormes.

Nowhere in this fresh type of writing readers saw shepherds, knights, castles, damsels in distress, neither giants nor dwarves, nor feats of bravery—they only heard the voice of a lad awakening to the realities of life determined to fight hunger and thus survive by his wits.

So successful was this novelette that immediately was translated into other European languages, initiating what today we call the picaresque genre. Soon after it was published in1554, pirated editions appeared in Germany, Holland, and France. But given the book’s anticlerical stance, it was placed in the Inquisition’s Index.

Although scholars have attributed the book to renowned humanists and writers of the time, no one has established authorship, and through its publishing history the novel remains anonymous. A child of its times, the novelette depicts the life of penury led by of those of the lower strata of society in Spain: misers, beggars, corrupt priests, impoverished squires, pardoners, constables, and others. What all these characters shared in common was their poverty and their hard earned wine and bread.

In Lazaro —the narrator and chronicler of his misadventures— we find a precedent of a social thesis that Jean Jacques Rousseau was to develop in the 18th century: that man is born innocent, good, and virtuous, but that it is society that corrupts him; in the case of Lazarus, a kind-hearted boy is turned into a callous, malicious, and cynical human being. Yet throughout all his tribulations the tender sparks of humanity seem to glow around him.

As Lazaro himself tells us, he was born of needy parents. His father, a miller worker, was accused and convicted of larceny, though he died the death of a soldier in defense of his nation: “At that time they were gathering an army to go fight the Moors, and my father —having been exiled for the disaster mentioned— went with them as a muleteer for an officer. Loyal servants they were, both he and his master lost their lives.” In a poignant moment, right before Lazaro begins his adventures he goes to see his mother: “And with both of us crying she gave me her blessing, saying ‘Son, I know that I’ll never see you again. Try to be good and God will be your guide. I’ve raised you and given you to a good master; take good care of yourself.’” Even in the depths of abject poverty and despair, Lazaro preserves an indomitable richness of heart and soul.

Just as Cervantes’ Don Quixote had sequels and hack imitations, Lazarillo’s original text suffered deletions, additions, misprints, and second and third volumes. My translation deals only with the original seven chapters.

Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide;  Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

My translation captures the life of Lazaro in contemporary American English. Nowhere in this fresh translation will you find "Thous and Thees" to delay your reading pleasure.




Available in KINDLE

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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