Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Write Essay: John Locke's Essay on Human Understanding Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Write Essay: John Locke's Essay on Human Understanding

An Essay concerning Humane Understanding in fo...Image via Wikipedia
AN ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING
Author: John Locke (1632-1704)


Summary of the Essay:
With An Essay Concerning Human Understanding John Locked attempted to inquire into the origin and extent of human knowledge; what today we call epistemology, concluding that all human knowledge is achieved simply because of our sense experiences.

Locke’s philosophy became the basis of what we study as British empiricism.
Bishop George Berkeley (1685-1753), rejected Locke's distinction between sense qualities independent of the mind and sense qualities dependent on the mind, posing his own idealistic philosophy against Locke's philosophy.
Structure of the Essay

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding contains four books: Book I, "Of Innate Notions"; Book II, "Of Ideas"; Book III, "Of Words"; and Book IV, "Of Knowledge, Certain and Probable."

Book I
Locke attacked the thesis that there are innate ideas, ideas with which humans are born and common to all men; they shape our convictions about the world.
He argues that many of these so called “innate ideas” have been derived in the course of our lives from sense experience, and that those ideas are not common to all men.

Book II
Locke discusses the origin of such ideas (abstracts) as those expressed by the words "whiteness," "hardness," "sweetness," "thinking," "motion," "man," etc. The second section states his answer.
Let us assume, he says, that the mind is a white and blank piece of paper, without any ideas. This premise allows him to ask: how is then the mind furnished? From where did all the materials of reason and knowledge come to be there? From experience! was his answer. Adding:
Our observation, employed either about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of our minds perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the materials of knowledge.
Sensation and Reflection are the two sources of our ideas. We perceive thing through our senses, acquiring the ideas of yellow, white, cold, as we move through life. Then, by reflection —an operation of the mind— we acquire the ideas of thinking, doubting, believing, knowing, willing, and other abstractions.

In sum, by sensation we acquire knowledge of exter¬nal objects; by reflection we acquire knowledge of our own minds.

What are Simple Ideas? Simple ideas are derived from sensation; that is, they have "one uniform appearance," even though a number of simple ideas may come together in the perception of an external object. The mind compares them to each other, combines and re-combines them, but never invents them—they neither created nor innate in the mind. By a "simple idea" Locke meant what Bertrand Russell called a "sense-datum," that comes from sense experience, such as the odor of decayed fruit, or the taste of a lemon. The uniqueness the reaction produced by these simple ideas Locked called “quality.”

The "quality" of something produces an idea in a person sensing the thing. Today, we prefer to say that something shows a "characteristic" or a "property."
Furthermore, Locke distinguished between primary and secondary qualities. Primary qualities are those which matter owns as part of itself; for example: solidity, extension, figure, motion or rest, and number. Secondary qualities are various sensations produced in humans by things; for example: colors, tastes, sounds, heat, and odors.

Locke also discussed a third kind of quality or power—the capacity to affect or to be affected by other objects. Thus, fire can melt clay; the capacity to melt clay is one of fire's powers, and such a power is neither a primary nor a secondary quality.

Complex ideas are operations of the mind, and they fall into three groups: ideas of modes, of substances, and of relations. Modes are ideas that are considered to be incapable of independent existence, being abstraction such as the ideas of triangle, gratitude, and the justice. When we think of substances we think of "particular things subsisting by themselves." Ideas of relations are the result of comparing ideas with each other.

After a consideration of the complex ideas of space, duration, number, infinite, pleasure and pain, sub¬stance, relation, cause and effect, and of the distinctions between clear and obscure ideas and between true and false ideas, Locke proceeded to a discussion,
Book III
In this book Locke discusses language: words and essences. Words are signs of ideas by "arbitrary imposition," depending upon noted simi¬larities and dis-similarities from which we form classes. Locke then went on to note the imperfections and abuses of words.

Book IV
To Locke knowledge is "the perception of the connection of, agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy, of any of our ideas." For example, white is not black because there is neither connection nor agreement, but a dissimilarity between what is white nor what is black. "White is not black" involves the separation by "is not" of the signs "white" and "black," signifying the disagreement between the ideas of white and black.

The remaining chapters of Book IV deal with his argument as to whether we have knowledge of our existence by intu¬ition, of the existence of God by demonstration, and of other things by sensation.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Labels: , , , ,


Comments on "Write Essay: John Locke's Essay on Human Understanding"

 

post a comment


Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

BROWSE: MORE THAN 560 ARTICLES

Book Reviews   Accounting 1   How to Become a Writer   Personal Finance   Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Accounting2 Solutions   Greeks Romans Trojans   Feminism   Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

Back to Top

Free Counter
Free Counter