Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Martin Luther: Facts on the Reformation Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Martin Luther: Facts on the Reformation



 MARTIN LUTHER (1483-1546)

Biographical data

Martin Luther was born at Eisleben, 10 November, 1483; died at Eisleben, 18 February, 1546. His father Hans was a rough, ill-tempered miner. His mother Margaret Ziegler, in contrast, was a pious and God-fearing woman. Domestic violence filled young Martin’s early years.
Martin Luther himself wrote: "on account of an insignificant nut, beat me till the blood flowed, and it was this harshness and severity of the life I led with them that forced me subsequently to run away to a monastery to become a monk."
Born to a poor peasant family, Luther obtained an elementary education as a "charity" student. In his fourteenth year (1497) he entered a school at Magdeburg.. In his fifteenth year we moved to Eisenach. When he was eighteen years of age (1501) he entered the University of Erfurt to study law. In 1502 he received the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, being the thirteenth among fifty-seven candidates. On January 6, 1505 he was advanced to the master's degree, being second among seventeen applicants.
Worried about his personal salvation, Luther became an Augustinian monk and practiced fasting, scourging, and other penitential works. Unhappy with the austere monastic life, he turned to an intensive study of the New Testament and German mystics, reaching the conclusion that salvation comes not through "works" —observing the formal directions of the church— but only through faith in Jesus Christ.
Having been ordained as a priest, he pursued further theological studies at the University of Witten­berg, where he received the degree of Doctor of the Holy Scriptures. Such credentials allowed him to become a professor of theology.
About this time he began his sermons and writings against certain ill practices of the church and in criticism of the prevailing scholastic theology.

What Was the Protest About?

On the eve of All ­Saints day in 1517, he posted on the door of the Castle Church —in Wittenberg— a "Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences." This was a scathing attack on the catholic church’s teaching on indulgences —which could be purchased at will— and their efficacy in absolving sins.
The "Ninety-five Theses," as the Disputation came to be known, was widely read and gained for Luther both enormous influence and aggravation. Dissatisfied with the open criticism the papal hierarchy tried to silence him. Conflict exploded. Martin Luther and his supporters vigorously challenged the tyrannical power of the papacy on matters of belief and worship.
As everyone expected, Martin Luther was excommunicated. In retaliation, in 1520 he launched an all-out attack on all kinds of practices of the church, including liturgy, rites, doctrines, and ceremonial activities.

The Reformation

The Reformation of the Catholic Church began in Germany, with the work of Martin Luther. It was a general movement against the various intellectual and practi­cal tendencies that had been under way for over a century.
Indeed it was a reaction against the methods of scholasticism, bringing about a revival of interest in secular literature, a clamoring for national independence, and the efforts of state governments to free themselves from the ecclesi­astical oppression.
The effects of the Reformation were to shatter once and for all the ecclesiastical unity of Europe, weakening its power as a form of argument, and thus expelling from political governance the notion of universal empire.
The movement split the power of the Church, leading to the formation of a number of mutually independent Christian churches.

Luther’s Writings: Political Philosophy

Machiavelli, the first modern political theorist proclaimed indifference to the truth of religion, appealing more to secular experience and human reason. While Machiavelli’s books Discourses and Prince concentrated on political power and governance, Lartin Luther’s voluminous writings were concerned mainly with theological and ethical questions.
In a pamphlet entitled Concerning Good Works (1519), he replied to the charge that his preference of faith over works meant a rejection altogether of works —meaning good charitable works— as an element of salvation.
His famous Open Letter to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation was a demand for total reform of the whole table of organization and practice of Christianity, advocating an agency of a council of priests and laymen presided over by the Emperor. The times were changing, and with change came a new fervor for nationalistic sentiment.
In 1523, he published a treatise, Concerning Secular Authority: to What Extent It Should Be Obeyed, in which he argued that civil authority is ordained of God since the majority of the human race are not Christians. Civil authority must be in control —not the church— and it should be defended even the people had to be armed.

Importance of Martin Luther

Martin Luther was a courageous individual who was not afraid to die to expose the truth about the corruption in the Catholic Church, that eradicating abuse and falsehood was a worthy cause. Although many of his writings were not deliberately political, they contain many lessons for political philosophy.



Comments on "Martin Luther: Facts on the Reformation"

 

post a comment


Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

BROWSE: MORE THAN 560 ARTICLES

Book Reviews   Accounting 1   How to Become a Writer   Personal Finance   Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Accounting2 Solutions   Greeks Romans Trojans   Feminism   Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

Back to Top

Free Counter
Free Counter