Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Guy de Maupassant's The Necklace: Writing Techniques Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Guy de Maupassant's The Necklace: Writing Techniques

Read "Selected Essays of Francis Bacon" in contemporary American English: available in KINDLE amazon.com $1.99 If you don't own a KINDLE at this time you may download "Maupassant's The Collar" into your computer for only $0.99. Use the Paypal button below:

Essay 3 — Writing Techniques

In the opening paragraph of the story we learn that an anonymous and totally omniscient narrator is telling the story. The voice of this narrator is assertive, opinionated, and seems to know many details about the protagonist:
She was one of those pretty and charming girls born — as though fate had erred— into a family of clerks. She had no marriage dowry, no expectations, no means of getting known, understood, loved, or wedded by a man of wealth and distinction; and she let herself be married off to a little clerk in the Ministry of Education.
Lots of information is packed in the opening paragraph: that the heroine is pretty, of a working class status, single, and submissive (since she lets herself be married off).

Almost immediately the narrator tells readers that she —Mme. Loisel— has a vivid imagination and what she imagines frequently are escapist visions, grandiose visions that clash with her ordinary reality. This is intimation that she is unhappy with her lot. Ironically, her fulfilled fantasies —which should have brought happiness to her— bring her nothing but pain, poverty, and misery; a ruined life. The adage “beware of what you wish for,” seems to fit her.

Not only does the narrator focus on objective reality, but also in her subjectivity: She had no clothes, no jewels, nothing, yet these were the only things she loved, feeling that she was made for them. For so long she had wished so eagerly to charm, to be envied, to be wildly seductive—courted.

When a narrator tells about the intimate feelings and thoughts of a character, readers can tell that the narrator is getting “inside the characters’ heads.” And like a god, the narrator can “see” what is inside characters. Notice what happens in this passage:
Suddenly she discovered, in a black satin case, a superb diamond necklace; her heart began to beat with insane desire. Her hands trembled as she lifted it. She fastened it round her neck, upon her high dress, and remained in ecstasy at her own reflection.
Here we the narrator makes us visualize objects: the black satin case, the diamond necklace itself, and we can also see her hand shaking. But not content with this objective description, the voice of the narrator tells us that her “heart began to beat with insane desire,” and that she “remained in ecstasy at her own reflection.” Only a god can know these details; which confirms that we are following the story as told by a complete omniscient narrator, acting as god.

As the story is about to conclude, the narrator adopts a less authoritative technique: what today we call “indirect free speech (IFS).” By using this technique, the readers are left wondering as to who is giving them the information—is it the narrator or the character? The boundaries have been deliberately blurred, and this adds credibility to the plot:

What would have happened if she had never lost those jewels. Who knows? Who knows? How strange life is, how fickle! How little is needed to ruin or to save! In the above passage we detect a tone of voice that isn’t really the narrator. Although we aren’t being told directly who is asking those questions and making the exclamation, we can infer by the tone that it is Mme. Loisel who is speculating about life.

Of course literary history tells us that Maupassant’s mentor Gustave Flaubert was one of the inventors of IFS, as it can easily be seen in his novel Madame Bovary. That Maupassant used this technique is a credit to his teacher.

Read "Selected Essays of Francis Bacon" in contemporary American English: available in KINDLE amazon.com $1.99 If you don't own a KINDLE at this time you may download "Maupassant's The Collar" into your computer for only $0.99. Use the Paypal button below:


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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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