Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Sunday, August 4, 2013

Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan


THOMAS HOBBES (1588-1679) 

Biographical Data

      Thomas Hobbes was born in London on April 5, 1588. Allegedly, he was born prematurely when his mother learned of the impending invasion of the Spanish Armada. Little is known of his childhood; his mother’s name is unknown. His father, Thomas Hobbes, was the vicar of Westport. Of Thomas Hobbes senior, it is well known that he abandoned his three children as he fled his parish —Westport— for fear of prosecution due to a violent altercation with another clergyman.

A graduate of Oxford, he was employed as tutor in the family of the Earl of Devonshire. He was also engaged as tutor in mathematics to the Prince of Wales (afterwards Charles II), when the family lived in exile in France.
At Oxford Hobbes fell under the influence of Italian physicist, astronomer, and mathematician Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), studying mathematics and philosophy. Galileo’s new scientific theory on the laws of motion and physical nature gave Hobbes the platform on which he built his own synthetic philosophy about man, society, and the physical world.

 Literary Output:

Political Writings

Hobbes wrote several versions of his political philosophy:
The Elements of Law, Natural and Politic (also under the titles Human Nature and De Corpore Politico) published in 1650.
De Cive (1642) published in English as Philosophical Rudiments Concerning Government and Society in 1651.
The Leviathan published in 1651, and its Latin revision in 1668.
History of the English Civil War, Behemoth (published 1679), De Corpore (1655), De Homine (1658).
Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student of the Common Laws of England (1681).
The Questions Concerning Liberty, Necessity, and Chance (1656).

Other Writings

Hobbes also contributed to a diverse array of other fields, including history, geometry, the physics of gases, theology, ethics, and general philosophy.

Hobbes' Bridge to Immortality

The Leviathan, or the Matter, Form and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil.1 (1651) is considered Hobbes’ magnum opus.
In the first part of Leviathan, Hobbes deals with his conception of social philosophy, which is basically hedonistic, materialistic, and deterministic. In the “state of nature” —a pre-political stage— man is untethered to do as he pleases—totally unrestrained and without a government. Hence, man’s life was "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short."

From this stage Hobbes moves on to a second stage in which he discusses the ideas of a social contract and a commonwealth. The third and fourth parts of the Leviathan deal with theological and ecclesiastical subjects.

The third step in the three-fold design just indicated was ac­complished before the other two, and is embodied in the work which appeared in

Hobbes' Famous Quotes

Hobbes referred to the natural state of mankind (before a central government) as: "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short."

The right of nature... is the liberty each man hath to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life.

Curiosity is the lust of the mind.

It is not wisdom but Authority that makes a law.

In the state of nature profit is the measure of right.

The secret thoughts of a man run over all things, holy, profane, clean, obscene, grave, and light, without shame or blame.

There is no such thing as perpetual tranquility of mind while we live here; because life itself is but motion, and can never be without desire, nor without fear, no more than without sense.

Force and fraud are in war the two cardinal virtues.


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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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