Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@gmail.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best seller as of now is

Titanes de la Filosofia

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Marc Chagall (1887-1985) - I and the Village Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Marc Chagall (1887-1985) - I and the Village




Brief Biography

Moishe Zakharovich Shagalov, better known today as Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was a mixed media artist that excelled in all his favorite fields: stained glass windows, murals, tapestries of biblical themes, and —of course— painting.
Chagall was born in Vitebsk, then part of the Russian Empire. He was the eldest of nine children in a Hasidic family. After studying art near home, he sought to expand his experience and knowledge of the world, he moved to St. Petersburg first, and later (1911) to Paris.
A young man still going through the apprentice stage of his life, he was influenced by fauvism and cubism. His period paintings show a predilection for geometric compositions.
While visiting his hometown in 1914, World War I broke out, preventing his return to Paris. In 1915, he married Bella Rosenfeld, who later became his favorite model. After the Russian Revolution, he was appointed commissar of the arts for the region of Vitebsk.
In 1923, Chagall moved from Berlin Paris, where he made a living doing illustrations for Nikolai Gogol's Dead Souls, Jean de La Fontaine's Fables, and the Bible. Persecuted by the Nazis, in 1941, Chagall was granted asylum in the United States.

I and the Village (1911)

I have always been fascinated by Chagall’s painting “I and the Village.” Not that I am partisan of cubist works; in fact I really can never warm up to any cubist painting. Yet, this particular canvas has always touched me in a mysterious way. The painting captures life in Vitebsk, a small village where Chagall grew up.  
In art, I think we either like something or we don’t. Simple as that. Yet, humans that we are, we can’t help to look for answers, and perhaps find these answers —if there are any— in analysis. Much against my instinct I never tried not to analyze “I and the Village.” So, for years I simply enjoyed the painting. Of late, however, and perhaps due to my advancing in years, I have reflected on the painting and its attraction to me.
To begin with, I was born in a small village in Peru. So naturally, the country images: the cow, the few houses, the church, the peasants, agricultural tools, and rural nature, for me, always have held an evocative, nostalgic, hypnotic power.
Rather than the loud colors, I have been attracted by the fluffy white and blackness of the sky; not a pitch black sky, for we can glimpse a feeble glimmer of light behind clouds, and even popcorn-like snow studding the starless night. Countless times I’ve placed myself in the midst of the painting, and every time I have inevitably felt a sense of communion with that simple life—away from the mundane din of New York City, where I have lived for the past 50 or so years.
I am convinced that my spiritual connection with the painting comes from the disarray of triangles that connect the nature’s basic spheres: flora, fauna, and man.
The straight line that depicts the direct eye-to-eye stare between man and cow is the artist’s way of conveying communion, if not downright love of nature.
Despite the wintry, frozen wonderland, I cannot help feeling terrific warmth in my heart for this painting.
I and the Village is currently on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.



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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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