Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Sir Walter Scott's Lives of the Novelists Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Monday, August 5, 2013

Sir Walter Scott's Lives of the Novelists



Sir Walter Scott's Lives of the Novelists

Available in Kindle and Nook.


Introduction by Marciano Guerrero

Brief Biography

 Sir Walter Scott (1771 – 1832) was born on in Edinburgh; his father was an attorney and his mother was the daughter of professor of medicine.
Although physically impaired in the right leg, he grew up to be an imposing vigorous man of over six feet.
He attended Edinburgh High School and studied at Edinburgh University arts and law. Scott was apprenticed to his father in 1786 and in 1792 he was called to the bar.
In 1797 Scott married Margaret Charlotte Charpenter. In time, the couple had five children.
From an early age Scott developed a keen interest in the old Border tales and ballads, devoting much of his time to research and the exploration of the Border country. By 1802 his first major work, Minstrelsy of The Scottish Border appeared.
But it was in poetry where he first achieved recognition; particularly with the publication of “The Lay of The Last Minstrel,” in 1805; the poem was based on an old border country legend. Many other major works were to follow; especially literary novels, and historical romances.
Though he was successful in the cultivation of letters, the letters as a business failed him, leaving him indebted for many years, since he agreed to honor his debts with his writing.
In the 1810s Scott published several novels. From this period date such works as Waverley (1814), dealing with the rebellion of 1745, which attempted to restore a Scottish family to the British throne. Guy Mannering (1815) and Tales Of My Landlord (1816), followed.
Given his great physical stamina, Scott became perhaps one of the most productive and prolific writers of his generation. Not only did he write short stories, novels, poems, plays, and general essays, but he developed a great reputation as a literary critic and historian. To complete his research, he traveled to different European countries.
He died in 1832, and he is buried in Dryburgh Abbey.

About the Lives of the Novelists

Scott was very much interested in writing techniques, in the construction of narratives, but in particular about the scaffolding of novels. So he wrote many essays to include a series which he collected and published as ‘The Novelist’s Library.’ Later, he agreed to give his printer a series of ‘prefaces’ which could be printed in a separate volume as “The Lives of the Novelists.’ In 1827, the Lives were included in Scott’s Miscellaneous Prose Work.
The Lives is comprised of sketches or semblances of fourteen novelists, to include Samuel Johnson, who only wrote one novel. For many readers these semblances contain great historical rather than literary value. The prose is light, yet engaging; gossipy yet seriously informative. Scott himself said that the Lives have no “claim to merit of much research, being taken from the most accessible materials.”
This first volume includes the lives of Fielding, Smollett, Le Sage, Charles Johnstone, Sterne, Goldsmith, and Johnson. In the second volume, now in process, we will include the other seven novelists: Mackenzie, Walpole, Reeve, Richardson, Bage, Cumberland, and Mrs. Radcliffe.

Partial list of Scott’s works:


       Fiction

            A Legend of Montrose
            Guy Mannering
            Ivanhoe
            Kenilworth
            Old Mortality
            Peveril of the Peak
            Quentin Durward
            Redgauntlet
            Rob Roy
            St. Ronan's Well
            The Abbot
            The Antiquary - Volume I
            The Antiquary - Volume II
            The Betrothed
            The Black Dwarf
            The Bride of Lammermoor
            The Chronicles of the Canongate
            The Fair Maid of Perth
            The Fortunes of Nigel
            The Heart of Mid-Lothian
            The Monastery
            The Surgeon’s Daughter
            The Talisman
            Woodstock

        Non-Fiction

            Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft
            The Journal of Sir Walter Scott

      Poetry Books

            Marmion

       Short Stories

            The Tapestried Chamber
            My Aunt Margaret's Mirror

        Poetry

            Pibroch of Dunald Dhu
            Romance of Dunois
            The Dance of Death
            The Field of Waterloo
            The Lady of the Lake
            The Troubadour
            The Vision of Don Roderick

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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