Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Sartor Resartus by Thomas Carlyle Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

Book Reviews  

Books

Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Monday, October 14, 2013

Sartor Resartus by Thomas Carlyle



 

Introduction by Marciano Guerrero

Brief Bio of Thomas Carlyle

Thomas Carlyle (1757–1832), was born in Scotland. Carlyle was brought up as a strict Calvinist, and was educated at the village school. Later he prepped at an academy before he won a place at the University of Edinburgh.
In 1816 he obtained a position to teach Latin, French, arithmetic, bookkeeping, geometry, navigation and geography. In November 1818, suffering from depression, Carlyle resigned and returned to Edinburgh, where he met a Grace Welsh, a recent widow. With her help—she reviewed and criticized his writing—he developed as a writer. His admiration for Goethe induced him to translate some of Goethe’s masterpieces.
As his reputation grew, Carlyle started to receive commissions from The Edinburgh Review and The Foreign Review.
Thomas and Jane Carlyle moved to London, where he befriended John Stuart Mill and he had several articles published in his Westminster Review. Mill suggested that Carlyle should write a book about the French Revolution. When the book was published, Ralph Waldo Emerson arranged for it to be published in America.

About Sartor Resartus

What serious essays don’t accomplish, fiction often does. This is the case of Carlyle’s publication of Sartor Resartus, which established him as a social critic. The work was received with much confusion because of its unique literary style; never mind that not many people really understood the work.
The title of the work means "the tailor re-tailored" and highlights the main theme of the work: that social customs and religious and political institutions are merely the "clothing" of essential realities.
The book is a framed novel, with Carlyle assuming the role of editor, of the theories of the German Professor Diogenes Teufelsdröckh (devil's dung). Such theories the author calls a Philosophy of Clothes. Teufelsdröckh's philosophy holds that just as clothes go out of fashion, the same thing happen to ideas and institutions.  In other words: there’s such a thing as paradigm shifts. Consequently, if one doesn’t change clothes (symbols), the least one can do is to patch them up.
Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges in one of lectures says:
He tells the story of an ill-fated love, of a young woman who seems to love him then leaves him, leaving him alone with the night. Then he describes conversations with this imaginary philosopher, and gives long excerpts from a book that never existed called Sartor, the Tailor. And, as he is the one giving excerpts from that imaginary book, he calls the work “The Mended Tailor.”
Carlyle's employs a deliberate literary style that can be exasperating to many readers. The style is obscure, irreverent, odd, eccentric, and often just downright silly. Such literary aberrations offended discerning readers who found the work contained an atheistic vision and other pernicious ideas. Those who defended Carlyle, simply said that his intention was only to be an equal opportunity exposer or all systems, which he viewed as limiting and false.
Our translation eliminates the tedious typography (e.g., excessive capitalization), obscure words, and long paragraphing. In addition, we have included distinctive summaries for each chapter.
This first book (of 3) introduces the philosophy of clothes, while also introducing the philosopher Diogenes Teufelsdröckh, all based on the copious notes provided by the friend of the philosopher, Herr Heuschrecke.  From chapter 8 on, we find that the discussion takes a serious turn when dealing with the world of spirit and pure reason—which is Kant’s language.
The change in tone from playful and sarcastic to serious and deep is what injects a perennial vitality to the work.

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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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