Professor Guerrero's Blog

mguerrero@google.com

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories of a Latino immigrant's success in USA; a journey from West Harlem to Sutton Place and Park Avenue. Check out the reviews in Amazon.com and in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

My best sellers are my translations of La Dame aux Camelias and Madam Bovary

Professor Guerrero's Blog: Mary Duffy's Sentence Openers: Chapter2 Verbs Ending in ING Professor Guerrero's Blog: Book Reviews, Human Interest Articles, Accounting Lessons, and Writing Techniques

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Sentence Openers Book: FREE Lessons

Jane Austen  

Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy

How to Become a Writer  

Personal Finance  

Self Help, Wealth, & Learning

Greeks Romans Trojans  

Feminism  

Great Gatsby: Is Nick Gay?

All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.

Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99


Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language. Transliterated into easy language for enjoyable reading pleasure. Because The Lazarillo of Tormes pointed a new direction, European and American literature benefited with titles that today are considered classics: Cervantes’ Rinconete and Cortadillo; Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones and Joseph Andrews; Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random, and Peregrine Pickle; Voltaire’s Candide; Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield. And many others to include American works ranging from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art. According to Ortega, the arts don't have to tell a human story; art should deal with its own forms—and not with the human form.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic. This e-book teaches how to break the pattern Subject-verb-object--and discard openings that begin with nouns, articles, and pronouns.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality. While business terminology is interwoven throughout these short stories, it's not business lessons that I take away with me, but life lessons. The circumstances and the characters' profound humanity are relatable despite their zip code . "Luke, Postmodern Man" offers a new vista into faith, suffering, and love of neighbor. Way after you read this book you'll find yourself thinking about the various characters throughout the series of stories and will find solace in their unwavering faith. The narrators' ability to reflect on their hardships with such serenity is inspiring.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers! Every page is filled with great writing tips, training lessons, and wonderful useful writing skills! Not only do I write essays for college, but also short stories!
--IVONNIE Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK













All my books are now in KINDLE


Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99
Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
Sentence Openers
East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5


The most beloved short story from Spanish literature
All my books are in NOOK $0.99 or in Amazon KINDLE $0.99








All my books are now in NOOK

Ideas About the Novel is a prophetic book that all writers must own.
Ideas About the Novel by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99

Next to Cervantes, Benito Perez Galdos is the most beloved Spanish writer of all times.

Torquemada at the Stake by Perez Galdos- my translation $0.99

Lazarillo of Tormes - my translation $0.99
Read it in contemporary English -- No Thous, Thees, or King James' Bible language.

Dehumanization of Art by Ortega y Gasset - my translation $0.99
The Dehumanization of Art— is now a constant in music, literature, aesthetics, and philosophy, having come to mean that in post-modern times human-shaped mimesis (representation of the human) is irrelevant to art.

Sentence Openers
How writers open their sentences makes prose agile, interesting, and athletic.

East of Tiffany's - bestseller $5
With the city as its backdrop "East of Tiffany's" is filled with earnest tales of love, loss, faith, success and morality.



My writing was as flat as a sidewalk. And then I downloaded ...

Mary Duffy's Toolbox for Writers
After I purchased Mary's e-book I started to get 'A's in my essays and term papers!
--Ivonnie Indrawan
College student
Sentence Openers on KINDLE

Sentence Openers on NOOK





Available in KINDLE $0.99


Available in KINDLE $0.99

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Mary Duffy's Sentence Openers: Chapter2 Verbs Ending in ING



Present Participles (Verbs Ending in —ing) Used as Sentence Openers

When master writers use these verbals (verbs ending in —ing), they achieve a sense of action, a sense of immediacy that puts the reader in the midst of the scene. Take this scene from Giuseppe di Lampedusa’s The Leopard:
The waters came spurting in minute jets, blown from shells of tritons and Naiads, from noses of marine monsters, spluttering and pattering on greenish verges, bouncing and bubbling, wavering and quivering, dissolving into laughing little gurgles; from the whole fountain, the tepid water, the stones covered with velvety moss, emanated a promise of pleasure that would never turn to pain (Lampedusa 73).
Or, from Nikos Kazantzakis’ Zorba the Greek:
He threw himself into the dance, clapping his hands, leaping and pirouetting in the air, falling on his knee, leaping again with his legs tucked up—it was as if he were made of rubber (Kazantzakis 70).
The Present Participle should not be confused with the ‘Progressive Tense’ which requires the verb ‘to be.’ At the end of this section you’ll find a brief discussion and examples of the progressive tense, also called ‘continuous Present.’
Because of their effectiveness in dragging the reader into the action, present participles make powerful sentence openers. When present participles are used as sentence openers, they function as adjectives, or to be more precise, as adjective substitutes which modify the subject.
Creeping from the house and slinking off like a thief: groping with his hand when first he got into the street as if he were a blind man, and looking often over his shoulder while he hurried away … (Dickens, Nickebly  902).
Hearing that, Hog’s eyes fogged up as if in gratitude as he mumbled under his breath, “Puerto Ricans ain’t that bad” (Guerrero 77).
Swarming over it all were lilies, roses and vines (Lewis 156).
Passing through a warehouse which presented every indication of a thriving business, Mr Cheeryble (for such Nicholas supposed him to be, from the respect which had been shown him by the warehousemen and porters whom they passed) … (Dickens, Nickebly 535).
Sucking a lemon he took stock of his surroundings (Lowry 349).
Scrutinizing the most abstract of legalistic terms, asking himself just what it meant to plead and pass judgment in terms of “legal fictions,” he proposed a methodic search for “archetypes” (Burke 90).
In his essay “To Err is Human—To Float, Divine,” collected in his book Mere Anarchy, Woody Allen connects with the reader by opening his book with the present participle:
Gasping for air, my life passing before my eyes in a series of wistful vignettes, I found myself suffocating some months ago under the tsunami of junk mail that cascades through the slot in my door each morning after kippers (3).
Following up on Woody Allen’s examples, focus on the prepositions that follow the present participle: ‘for’ follows ‘gasping’ and ‘before’ follows ‘passing.’ This pattern always emerges in the style of prolific writers such as Charles Dickens, Elizabeth George and Stephen King.
In addition, master writers use the pattern to complement outward descriptions of actions in which characters are engaged. 
Here are a few examples of the present participle followed by prepositions from Charles Dickens’ Nicholas Nickleby:
Climbing up another perpendicular flight, composed with great mechanical ingenuity of nothing but corner, stairs, Mr Ralph Nicklebly stopped to take a breath on the landing … (81).
Regarding with no small curiosity and interest all the busy preparations for the coming day which every street and almost every house displayed … (105).
Lifting up his eyes, as he arrived at the conclusion that there was no remedy for this unfortunate state of things, he beheld a horseman toward him … (223).
Uttering in a loud voice such of the latter allusions as were complimentary to the unconscious phenomenon, and giving the rest in a confidential ‘aside: to Nicholas … (466).
Passing through a warehouse which presented every indication of a thriving business, Mr Cheeryble (for such Nicholas supposed him to be, from the respect which had been shown him by the warehousemen and porters whom they passed) … (535).


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This book is for college students, high school students, teachers, professors, instructors, artists, engineers, doctors, nurses,
attorneys, paralegals, police officers, law enforcers, mechanics, translators, writers, novelists, sales reps, PR specialists,
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Professor Guerrero's Blog

Co-author of East of Tiffany's, 13 short stories that will warm your heart - See 101 reviews in Amazon.com and 37 in Barnes and Noble.

on KINDLE on NOOK

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